Adolf von Hildebrand, Relief Bismarck

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Description

EXPECTED SOON

‘Relief Bismarck’
Bronze cast after a plaster model of 1895. The 1895-plaster model, based on the 1893-model for the Jena Fountain for which Bismarck posed, is in the possession of the Neue Pinakothek.

Size 61 x 61 cm; diameter 45 cm. 

No other round bronze casts are known.
In the literature it is stated that there is only one round bronze cast known with a diameter of 45 cm: Cosima Wagner commissioned in 1895 Hildebrand to create a round Bismarck relief, which she gave to Adolf von Gross, a close friend of the Richard Wagner family, long-time financial administrator of the Bayreuth Festival and an honorary citizen of Bayreuth: 

‘…erging ein privater Auftrag von Cosima Wagner an Hildebrand zu einem Bronzerelief des Altreichskanzlers. Einem Freund schrieb Cosima Ende März 1895: Auf meine Weise habe ich hier Bismarck…gefeiert. Es war nämlich der Geburtstag unseres so überaus verdienten Verwaltungsrathes [Adolf von Gross]; ich gab ihm ein überlebensgrosses Bronze-Relief des führsten [93c, diameter 45 cm] von Hildebrand gemeisselt und für mein Gefühl eines der schönsten Werke der modernen Kunst und bei weitem das beste Porträt Bismarcks‘ [Briefwechsel zwischen Cosima Wagner und Fürst Ernst zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg, Stuttgart 1937, S 116.]. Das Relief von Adolf von Gross ist nicht auffindbar….Source: Adolf von Hildebrand, Das plastische Portrait, by Angela Hass, 1984.

In August 1893 Bismarck posed several times for Adolf von Hildebrand, who was commissioned the design of a Bismarck Fountain in the city of Jena. Von Hildebrand created a relief of Bismarck (depicted in ‘die Kunst für alle’, 1993) which was used as model again in 1895, the 80th birthday of Bismarck.

Plastercast by Von Hildebrand, d.d. 1895. Size 45 x 45 x 7 cm. In the possession of the Neue Pinakothek.

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Bismarck-relief‘, signed 1893. Bronze. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst fur alle‘, December 1899. Displayed at the ‘Münchener Jahres-Ausstellung’, Glaspalast, 1894, and at the ‘Internationalen Kunst-Ausstellung des Vereins bildende Künstler Münchens (A.V.)’, Secession, 1895. Also depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.

Left: Bismarck relief by Von Hildebrand, 1895. Bronze, size 21 x 16 cm. In the possession of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden.
Right: Bismarck relief by Von Hildebrand, 1895. Bronze, size 21 x 16 cm. In the possession of the Hungarian National Gallery.
   

Adolf von Hildebrand, Bismarck relief. Silver cast. Size 7,2 x 9,6 cm. In the possession of the ‘Münzkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin‘.

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Bismarck Fountain’, city of Jena. The bronze relief, for which Bismarck posed in 1893, was cast in 1894. The Bismarck Fountain was revealed at 29 July 1894. A preliminary design of the fountain is depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
   

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Bismarck Fountain’, 1901, Schloss Rauischholzhausen, Rauischholzhausen (previously Schloss Neu Potsdam). Photos: statues.vanderkrogt.net.
   

 

– condition : II under restoration
– size : 61 x 61 cm; diameter of bronze relief is 45 cm
– signed : in the neck
– type : bronze
– weight
   

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BIOGRAPHY: ADOLF VON HILDEBRAND

 

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Bismarck Memorial‘, 1910, city of Bremen. Inaugurated on the 9th July 1910. The bronze equestrian statue is mounted atop a base six meters high and screened with limestone from Untersberg (also called ‘Salzburg Marble’). During World War II, the memorial was walled in on the north side of the Bremen cathedral to protect it from bombs. It was re-erected at its former site next to the cathedral on  23rd September 1952.
   

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Diana’ or ‘Junge Jägerin‘ (‘Diana‘ or ‘Young Hunter’). Bronze, located in the garden of the Hildebrand House, Bogenhausen, Maria-Theresia-Strasse 23, Munich.

The Hubertus Brunnen
Adolf von Hildebrand, ’Hubertus Brunnen‘ (‘Hubertus Fountain‘). The fountain designed by Adolf von Hildebrand and built between 1903-1906, was a gift of the city of Munich to the Prince Regent of Bavaria (1821 – 1912) for his 85th birthday. Originally located in front of the Bayerische Nationalmuseum in the Prinzregentenstrasse, it was removed in 1937, and relocated in 1954 to Neuhausen-Nymphenburg (Munich). The four bronzes in the niches, the deer inside (with a cross between its antlers) and the holy Hubertus on the roof, are all by Von Hildebrand. The marble inside comes from the Tegernsee region.
The four bronzes in the niches were installed in 1921, after the death of Von Hildebrand:
– ‘Junge Jägerin’ or ‘Diana, the goddess of the Hunt’: designed 1917, cast in 1920 by foundry Miller, Munich;
– ’Bogenschütze’ (‘Archer’): designed 1907, cast in 1920 by foundry Miller;
– ‘Wurzelweib’: designed 1915, cast by foundry Leyer, Munich;
– ‘Alter Jäger’ (‘Old Hunter’): designed 1911, cast in 1911 by foundry Leyrer, Munich.

Two of the four niche-figures of the Hubertus Fountain.
Left: ‘Diana, the Goddess of the Hunt’.
Right: ‘Archer’.
   

Left: The dear inside the Hubertus Brunnnen, with the cross between its antlers.
Right: the Hubertus Fountain with Hubertus -patron saint of hunters- on the roof.
   

 

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Wittelsbacher Brunnen’, 1895.
Left: the ‘Steinwerfer auf den Wasserpferd’ (‘Stone Thrower on Sea-Horse’), part of the Wittelsbacher Brunnen.
Right: Wittelsbacher Brunnen, Lenbachplatz, Munich. Commissioned by the city of Munich. Restored by Theodor Georgii from 1951 to 1952. Photos: 2017.
The Wittelsbach family is a European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria. The family reigned as kings of Bavaria until 1918. On 12 November 1918 Ludwig III issued the Anif declaration at Anif Palace, Austria, in which he released his soldiers and officials from their oath of loyalty to him and ended the 738-year rule of the House of Wittelsbach in Bavaria. The republican movement thereupon declared a republic.
   

Wittelsbacher Brunnen, Theodor Georgii restoring in 1951/52 the ‘Steinwerfer auf den Wasserpferd’ (‘Stone Thrower on Sea-Horse’).
   

Adolf von Hildebrand and his son in law Theodor Georgii, ‘Reiterdenkmal für Luitpold von Bayern’ (‘Memorial for Luitpold von Bayern’), 1913. Located in front of the Bavarian Nationalmuseum, Prinzregentenstraße 3. Munich.
 

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Luna’ (‘Moon’), 1899. Marble, life-size. Displayed at the ‘Deutsche Kunstausstellung in Dresden’, 1899. Also depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
Right: ‘Luna’ by Von Hildebrand, depicted in ‘Die Kunst für alle’, 1899.
 

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Prinzregent Luitpold‘, 1900. Bronze, 56 x 40 cm. Luitpold Karl Joseph Wilhelm Ludwig, Prince Regent of Bavaria (1821 – 1912), was the de facto ruler of Bavaria from 1886 to 1912, due to the incapacity of his nephews, King Ludwig II and King Otto.
Left: ‘Prinzregent Luitpold‘ by Von Hildebrand, in the possession of the Neue Pinakothek. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
Right: ‘Prinzregent Luitpold‘ by Von Hildebrand, depicted in ‘Die Kunst für alle’, 1899/90. Displayed at the ‘Ausstellung 1900 der Münchener Secession’. 
 

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Kugelspieler’ (‘Bowls Player’), marble, 1886. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
Left: ‘Kugelspieler’ by Hildebrand, depicted in ‘Die Kunst für alle’, 1902.
Right: ‘Kugelspieler’ by Hildebrand, in the possession of the Neue Pinakothek. 
   

Left: Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Philioktet’ (‘Philoctetes’), plaster, 1886. In the possession of the Neue Pinakothek.
Right: Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Bildnis einer jungen Frau‘ (‘Portrait of a Young Woman‘), 1917. Plaster, height 35 cm. In the possession of the Neue Pinakothek.
   

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Amazonenjagd’ (‘Hunting Amazons’), mid-part of the Amazons-triptych, 1887/88. In the possession of the Neue Pinakothek, München.

Left: Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Herbst’ (‘Autumn’), 1888. Plaster, life-size. Relief in the possession of the Lenbachaus, Munich. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
Right: ‘Herbst’ by Von Hildebrand, depicted in ‘Die Kunst für alle’, 1914/15.
 

Left: Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Der Netzträger’ (‘The Carier‘), 1886. Marble. Also named ‘Der Fischer’. In the possession of the Neue Pinakothek. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
Right: Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Schlafende Hirtenknabe‘ (‘Sleeping Shepherd Boy‘), 1871/73. Marble. In the possession of the Nationalgalerie, Berlin. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
   

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Trinkende Junge‘ (‘Drinking Boy‘), 1871/73. Bronze. In the possession of the Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.

Left: Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Männliche Figur’ (‘Standing Young Man‘), 1881/84. Marble, life-size. In the possession of the Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
Right: Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Cain and Abel’, 1890. Stone, lenght 65 cm. In the possession of the Metropolitan Museum. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
   

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Rastende Merkur‘ (‘Resting Mercury‘), bronze, 1885/86. In the possession of the Neues Museum Weimar. Depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’, by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Bogenschütze’ (‘Archers’). Two plaster reliefs depicted in ‘Adolf Hildebrand’ by Alexander Heilmeyer, 1902.
   

Adolf von Hildebrand, ‘Doggenbrunnen’ (‘Dog Fountain’), 1912. Located in the garden of Robert Mendelssohn, Berlin. Depicted in the magazin Jugend, 1921, Heft 28. 


 

Adolf von Hildebrand, most important German sculptor from 1880 to the end of World War I.
Adolf von Hildebrand (1847-1926), born at Marburg, was the son of the economics professor Bruno Hildebrand. From 1880 to the end of World War I, Von Hildebrand- who worked in Neo-classical tradition- was considered the most important German sculptor. A rival of Rodin, with whom he nevertheless shared an important aim: the reduction of psychological and not strictly necessary detail. In contrast with Rodin, Von Hildebrand aspired towards the clear, classical and perfected form, especially that of the human body, whereas Rodin tended to opt for the torso, the ‘unfinished’.
Von Hildebrand studied first at the Kunstschule in Nürnberg, then at the Munich Academy under Kaspar von Zumbusch and later in Berlin under Rudolf Siemering.
In 1867 he went to Rome where he met and befriended the painter Hans von Marées and the art theorist Konrad Fiedler. Stimulated by Fiedler, Von Hildebrand wrote in 1893 the still much discussed and valued book ‘Das Problem der Form in der bildenden Kunst’ (‘The problem of Form in Painting and Sculpture’). It primarily considers the psychological genesis of the three-dimensional work of art according to the laws of the human eye. Fiedler was the first client to commission art works to Von Hildebrand in 1870: his own portrait and the ‘Trinkender Knabe’ (‘Drinking Boy’, now in the Nationalgalerie Berlin).
In 1873, Von Hildebrand settled in Florence, where he lived and worked for the next twenty years. He married there and produced portraits (mainly commissioned), statues, reliefs and tombstones. He worked as an autodidact, learning from the old masters. A friend of Hans von Marées, he designed the architectural setting for the painter’s murals in the library of the German Marine Zoological Institute at Naples (1873). For years later he married Irene Schäuffelen; their daughter Irene would marry Von Hildebrand’s most important pupil Theodor Georgii.
Von Hildebrand spent a significant amount of time in Munich after 1889, executing one of his most important works, the monumental fountain ‘Wittelsbacher Brunnen’ at the Maximilian-platz. He is also known for five other monumental urban fountains and for the Bismarck monument in Bremen, unveiled in 1910.
Overall Von Hildebrand designed 15 monuments and numerous tombs and mausoleums. With over 250 portraits (including 84 reliefs), he was one of the best portraitists of his time; personalities who sat for him were great scientists or inventors, princes, succesful artists and top musicians. In 1896 Von Hildebrand was asked to take over the direction of the sculpture class at the Münchner Kunstakademie; he refused any form of salary except for the money to buy the stones.
Von Hildebrand was ennobled by the King of Bavaria in 1904.
He died in Munich in 1921.