Franz Metzner, Candle Holder

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Price: € 7,400

Description

Candle Holder (Kerzenleuchter)
Created 1900 – 1903. Executed in tin plated bronze.

Left: the candle holder by Metzner, depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1903. Created in bronze.
Right: the candle holder displayed at the exhibition ‘Franz Metzner, Ein BIldhauer der Jahrhundertwende’, Berlin, Vienna, Prague, Leipzig, 1977/ 78. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue.  

– condition : II
– size : height 25,4 cm
– signed
– type : tin plated bronze
   

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BIOGRAPHY: FRANZ METZNER

Monument to the Battle of the Nations
The biggest monument in Europe
The Monument to the Battle of the Nations (Völkerschlachtdenkmal) is a monument in Leipzig, Germany, to the 1813 Battle of Leipzig, also known as the Battle of the Nations. Paid for mostly by donations and the city of Leipzig, it was completed in 1913 for the 100th anniversary of the battle at a cost of six million goldmarks.
The monument commemorates Napoleon’s defeat at Leipzig, a crucial step towards the end of hostilities in the War of the Sixth Coalition. The coalition armies of Russia, Prussia, Austria and Sweden were led by Tsar Alexander I of Russia and Karl Philipp, Prince of Schwarzenberg. There were Germans fighting on both sides, as Napoleon’s troops also included conscripted Germans from the left bank of the Rhine annexed by France, as well as troops from his German allies of the Confederation of the Rhine. It was the first massed battle in the history of the world: all the nations of Europe were represented on the battlefield. It was also the scene of fighting in World War II, when Nazi forces in Leipzig made their last stand against U.S. troops.

Except for the figure of Archangel Michael (done by Christian Behrens ⧾ 1905), all the sculptures of the Völkerschlachtdenkmal are by Franz Metzner.
Inside, the monument contains two floors. The first floor is known as the crypt, although no one is buried there, and features 8 stone statues. These 8 ‘Schicksalmasken’ (‘Masks of Fate’) represent fallen warriors in the form of massive medieval knights who are each flanked by two other figures known as ‘Totenwächter’ (Guards of the Dead). The second story, known as the ‘Ruhmeshalle’ (Hall of Fame) contains four more giant figures of each 9.5 meters high, representing the four legendary historic qualities ascribed to the German people: bravery, faith, sacrifice, and fertility. Twelve ‘Wächterfiguren’ (Guards) by Metzner, each 13 meter high, are encircling the dome of the Völkerschlachtdenkmal. Up in the circle of the dome (68 meters high) is a series of 324 riders returning  home. Another 94 sculptures by Metzner are integrated in the stone frames of the stained-glass windows.

Left: the first floor, the ‘Krypta’ (Crypt).
Right: the second floor, the Ruhmeshalle’ (Hall of Fame). Visable are also  the sculptures by Metzner integrated in the stone frames of the stained-glass windows.
   

Up in the circle of the dome (68 meters high), the series of 324 riders returning  home. 

‘Wächterfiguren’ (Guards) by Metzner, each 13 meter high, encircling the dome of the Völkerschlachtdenkmal.

Left: Monument to the Battle of Nations, Leipzig.
Right: the revelation of the monument on 18 October 1913. Present are Kaiser Wilhelm II (1) and the King of Saxony (2). 
 

 

Paris World Exhibition 1900, – Gold Medal
Franz Metzner, ‘Spinx des Lebens’ (‘Spinx of Life’), vase displayed at the Paris World Exhibition in 1900. Awarded the Gold Medal. Height 36 cm, executed in 1898 by the Kgl. Preussische Porzellan-Manufaktur in Berlin.
Left: ‘Spinx des Lebens’ by Metzner, nowadays in the possession of the Bröhan Museum in Berlin, Landesmuseum für Jugensstill, Art Deco und Funktionalisums. Another cast is in the possession of the Museum Wiesbaden/ Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kultur.
Right: ‘Spinx des Lebens’ by Metzner, depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1900.
   

The former building of the Viennese Banking Association in Prague
In 1911 Metzner created several sculptures and reliefs for the building of the Viennese Banking Association in Prague.
Right: two figure-groups by Metzner on top of the former building of the Viennese Banking Association in Prag.
   

Left: sculpture by Metzner at the entrance of the former building of the Viennese Banking Association.
Right: sculptures by Metzner at the facade the former building of the Viennese Banking Association.   

Franz Metzner, reliefs in the hall of the Viennese Banking Association. Depicted in die ‘Kunst für Alle’, 1908/09. The lowest is named ‘Ackerbau’ (‘Plowing’).

The Weinhaus Rheingold, the legenday art temple in Berlin
‘A holy place of great, serious and truly German art’
The Weinhaus Rheingold in the Potsdamer Straße 3 in Berlin, built between 1905 and 1907, was designed by Bruno Schmitz. The numerous sculptures were by Franz Metzner and Hermann Feuerhahn. The building of this large scale wine restaurant extended over 5000 square meter and was ‘created as a holy place of great, serious and truly German art’. Clients were the well to do middle classes. Weinhaus Rheingold was an amazing place for size, being a large five-story structure crowded from the ground floor to the roof with art and dining chambers of different sizes. Many of the rooms, or halls, were truly imposing, very large, hung with grate glass-spangled chandeliers, set with pockets lights, finished in bronze, steel and fine marbles.
De building was destroyed by bombing in 1944.  Several sculptures were depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1907.

Left: Weinhaus Rheingold, 1907. View at Bellevuestrasse.
Right: Weinhaus Rheingold in the 1920s.

Reliefs by Metzner on the façade (Bellevuestrasse).
From left to right: name unknown, Eitelkeit (‘Vanity’), Kunst (‘Art’), Musik (‘Music’) and Schönheit (‘Beauty’).

Stone sculptures by Metzer in the Room of Odin, Weinhaus Rheingold.
       

Passage from the Pfeilersaal to the Roten Saal: die Rheingoldbrunnen. Three Daughters of the Rhein, standing on a marble basin, holding up the Nibelung Treasure (the ‘Nibelungenhort’).
     

‘Otto the Great’ and ‘Karl the Great’, sculptures by Metzer in the Kaisersaal, Weinhaus Rheingold.
 

Keystones and reliefs by Metzner in the Kaisersaal. Two plaster casts of the round reliefs of the Kaisersaal are in the possession of the North Bohemian Museum Liberec, Czech Republic.

 

          

‘Denkmal Kaiser Joseph II’, city of Teplitz (now Teplice, Czech Republic)
Franz Metzner, ´Denkmal Kaiser Joseph II´. Memorial to Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790, and sole ruler of the Habsburg Lands. Revealed in 1905 in the city of Teplitz (now Teplice, Czech Republic). The sculpture of Kaiser Joseph II was broken down at 10 November 1920, shortly after the end of WWI. However, the two flanking sculptures ‘Industry’ and ‘Agriculture’ by Metzner remained. The Kaiser Joseph figure was later replaced by a statue of Mozart. Today only the 50 meter long row of small reliefs by Metzer exists.

The Kaiser Joseph II Memorial by Metzner, before 1920.

Left: the over life-size figure ‘Industry’ by Metzner, located at the right sight of the Kaiser statue. Depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1912. A life size plaster cast of ‘Industry’ is in the possession of the North Bohemium Museum Liberec, Czech Republic.
Right: a 50 meter long row of small reliefs by Metzer adorned the balustrade. Depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1912. The row of reliefs is still exhisting.
   

The bronze figure of the Kaiser demolished at 10 November 1920 (the two big flanking sculptures initially survived).

The Kaiser Joseph figure was later replaced by a statue of Mozart. Notice that the two flanking over life-size sculptures, ‘Industry’ and ‘Agriculture’, were still there. 

Today only the row of small reliefs by Metzer exist.

 

Franz Metzner, ‘Ringer’ (‘Wrestler’). Created around 1906. Metzler created three different models of Ringer. One executed in ceramic is in the possession of the Ostdeutsche Galerie in Regensburg (height 31 cm). Two others are depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’ and the ‘Kunst für Alle’. The figures were displayed at the exhibitions ‘Kunstschau’, Vienna, 1908; ‘Berliner Secession’, 1908; ‘Internationale Kunstausstellung Rom’, 1911; ‘Sudetendeutsche Kunstausstellung Berlin’, 1937; and ‘Sudetendeutsche Kunstausstellung Dresden’, 1938.
Left: ‘Ringer’ by Metzner, depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1907/08.
Middle: ‘Ringer’ by Metzner, depicted in the ‘Kunst für Alle’, 1907/08. Displayed at the exhibition ‘Berliner Secession’, 1908.
Right: ‘Ringer’ by Metzner, depicted in the ‘Kunst für Alle, 1908/09.
     

The exhibition ‘Kunstschau’ in Vienna, 1908. Depicted is the ‘Meztler-saal’ (“Metzler-room’).

Left: Franz Metzner, ‘Mother with Child’. Created around 1916. Carrara marble, height 53,5 cm. Sold by a Czech auction house in 2016.
Right: Franz Metzner, ‘Torso eines weiblichen Aktes‘ (‘Torso of a female Nude‘), 1913/14. Marble. In the possession of the ‘Leipzig Museum der bildende Künste’.  
   

The Rüdiger of Bechelaren fountain
In 1904 Metzner was commissioned by the city of Vienna to create a Nibelung Fountain, planned to be placed in front of the Votivkirche. Metzner designed a statue of Rüdiger of Bechelaren, a character from the Nibelungen saga. He is shown deep in prayer, his sword resting on his arms, at the moment of making the decision whether to follow the Huns or the Burgundians. The statue has a granite base, encased with six relief panels showing male torsos.
However, in a very early stage the city of Vienna cancelled the project and the Gesellschaft zur Förderung deutscher Kunst und Wissenschaft in Prague bought the by then only realized part of the fountain, the bronze figure of Rüdiger. In 1924, five years after the death of Metzner, the city of Gablonz bought the Rüdiger figure and placed it finally in front of the Herz Jesu Kirche. For the basin of the fountain, reliefs were created after the original designs by Metzner. The fountain -bronze and reliefs- was revealed in 1931.
In the night from 14 to 15 Juni 1945, drunken Soviet soldiers tore down the statue and dragged it through the streets by a truck. Finally the bronze ended on a junkyard. A Soviet War Memorial was raised on its place in front of the Herz Jesu Kirche. In 1958 the fountain came in the possession of the Nationalgalerie in Prague.
Meanwhile the German population, which was violently expelled after 1945, had settled in the suburb Neugablonz in Kaufbeurer, Bavaria. The industrialists Otto Walter and Alfred Rediger from Neugablonz bought the fountain back from the Republic of Czechia for USD 10.000 in 1968. An additional 100.000 DM was raised and the fountain was re-erected on the grounds of the Herz Jesu Kirche in Neugablonz (this church was built as a copy of the church in Gablonz).
The city of Gablonz is considering to re-erect a copy of the fountain. Some Czech historians are the opinion that the original fountain -now in Kaufbeuren- should be returned to Gablonz.

The Rüdiger Brunnen by Metzler, located in Neugablonz-Kaufbeuren, Bavaria.
   

Left: the Rüdiger Brunnnen by Metzner, located in Gablonz (Czech Republic). Before 1945.
Right: the Rüdiger Brunnen in May 1945.
   

Franz Metzner, sculptures above the entrance and at the façade of the Cines Nollendorf Theater, Nollendorfplatz 4, Berlin. The theatre, built in 1912/13 and renamed ‘Ufa-Pavillon’ in 1927, was destroyed in an air raid in 1943.

Left: the entrance of the building.
Right: a sculpture from the side facade of the theater.
   

Franz Metzner, ‘Aschen Urne‘. Urn, cast by the Kgl. Porzellan-Manufaktur Charlottenburg. Displayed at the Paris World Exhibition in 1900.
Left: ‘Aschen Urne‘ by Metzner, depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1903.
Right: ‘Aschen Urne’ by Metzner, depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1900.
 

Franz Metzner, ‘Medusa’. Depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration‘, 1900. Planned to be executed with a Marble face surrounded by bronze snakes (‘Das Marmor-gesicht der Medusa sollen nach der Absicht des Künstlers bronzene Schlangen umgeben..‘).

Franz Metzler, 20 atlants at the facade of the Zachlerhaus in Vienna, 1905. The design of the atlants goes back to the model ‘Alter Mann‘ which Metzler displayed a year earlier at the ‘XX. Ausstellung der Vereinigung Bildener Künstler Österreichs Secession‘, Vienna, 1904.
 

Stoclet Palais, Brussel (UNESCO World Heritage Site)
When banker and art collector Adolphe Stoclet commissioned this house from one of the leading architects of the Vienna Secession movement, Josef Hoffmann, in 1905, he imposed neither aesthetic nor financial restrictions on the project. The house and garden were completed in 1911 and their austere geometry marked a turning point in Art Nouveau, foreshadowing Art Deco and the Modern Movement in architecture. Stoclet House is one of the most accomplished and homogenous buildings of the Vienna Secession, and features works by Koloman Moser, Gustav Klimt and Franz Metzner, embodying the aspiration of creating a ‘total work of art’ (Gesamtkunstwerk). Bearing testimony to artistic renewal in European architecture, the house retains a high level of integrity, both externally and internally as it retains most of its original fixtures and furnishings.
Stoclet House is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2009. Inter alia all four sculptures on top of the house are by Franz Metzner.
   

Volksbühne
The Volksbühne Berlin on Rosa Luxemburg Platz is one of the longest running venues in Berlin. Besides its regular theater events it also pays host to the Musikbühne programme which presents an extremely high quality series of live music concerts. The Volksbühne was built during the years 1913 to 1914 and was designed by Oskar Kaufmann, with integrated sculpture by Franz Metzner. During World War II, the theatre was heavily damaged. From 1950 to 1954, it was rebuilt according to the design of architect Hans Richter. The sculptures are lost.
Left: the entrance of the Volksbühne.
Right: two stone figures by Metzner from the entrance (lost). 
Below: a sculpture by Metzner from the facade on the side of the building.
 
    

Franz Metzner, ‘Reichenberg Brunnen’. Fountain-group in the city of Reichenberg (now Liberec, Czech Republik).  Designed in 1905, erected in 1925 (six years after the death of Metzner), destructed in 1945.
 

 


Left: Franz Metzner, date unknown.
Right: Franz Metzner, around 1903.
 

Franz Metzner
Celebrated in his time as the Germanic Antipode of August Rodin.
Franz Metzner (1870 – 1919), born in Wscherau (Czech Republic) was a influential Austrian/ German sculptor. From 1884 to 1888 Metzer learned the basics of craft and stone-cutting from stonemason Wild in Pilsen. He did further apprenticeships from 1889 to 1894 in Saxony: in Zwickau, Altenburg, Leipzig and in Breslau in the atelier of Christian Behrens. In the same period he travelled to Hamburg, Berlin, Frankfurt Am Main and to Paris and Italy. Metzner was an autodidact; apart from one evening course at the Dresdner Kunstgewerbeschule, he did not have any formal education or academic degree. In 1894 he went to Berlin were he founded his own studio in 1896. From 1897 to 1902 he worked predominantly as designer for the Königliche Porzelanmanufaktur in Berlin.  He was part of a group young employers, inspired by Jugendstill, who designed ‘artistic objects’, instead of ‘articles of use’.  In 1898 he participated for the first time in an exhibition in Berlin. Two years later he displayed several works (designed for the Kgl. Preussische Porzellan-Manufaktur) at the Paris World Exhibition 1900; he achieved fame by winning a Gold Medal for his design of an extraordinary vase, the ‘Spinx des Lebens’ (‘Spinx of Life’). Two copies of ‘Spinx des Lebens’ are nowadays in the possession of the Bröhan Museum in Berlin and the Museum Wiesbaden/ Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kultur.
In 1903 he displayed a large collection of his works at the ‘XVII Ausstellung der Wiener Succession’ in Vienna. His design for the Kaiserin Elisabeth memorial made him further known in Austria, and shortly later he was appointed  professor at the Vienna college of Arts and Sciences.  Metzner became a prominent member of the Wiener Succession. At the ‘XX Ausstellung der Wiener Sucession’ in 1904, Metzner had a separate exhibition room in which his work ‘Erde’ (‘Earth’) was placed in the center. In the same year he was commissioned by the city of Vienna to create a Nibelung Fountain, planned to be placed in front of the Votivkirche.

The Nibelung Fountain, planned to be placed in front of the Votivkirche
Metzner designed a statue of Rüdiger of Bechelaren, a character from the Nibelungen saga. He is shown deep in prayer, his sword resting on his arms, at the moment of making the decision whether to follow the Huns or the Burgundians. The statue has a granite base, encased with six relief panels showing male torsos. However, in a very early stage the city of Vienna cancelled the project and the Gesellschaft zur Förderung deutscher Kunst und Wissenschaft in Prague bought the by then only realized part of the fountain, the bronze figure of Rüdiger. In 1924, five years after the death of Metzner, the city of Gablonz bought the Rüdiger figure and placed it finally in front of the Herz Jesu Kirche. For the basin of the fountain, reliefs were created after the original designs by Metzner. The fountain -bronze and reliefs- was revealed in 1931. In the night from 14 to 15 Juni 1945, drunken Soviet soldiers tore down the statue and dragged it through the streets by a truck. Finally the bronze ended on a junkyard. A Soviet War Memorial was raised on its place in front of the Herz Jesu Kirche. In 1958 the fountain came in the possession of the Nationalgalerie in Prague. Meanwhile the German population, which was violently expelled after 1945, had settled in the suburb Neugablonz in Kaufbeurer, Bavaria. The industrialists Otto Walter and Alfred Rediger from Neugablonz bought the fountain back from the Republic of Czechia for USD 10.000 in 1968. An additional 100.000 DM was raised and the fountain was re-erected on the grounds of the Herz Jesu Kirche in Neugablonz (this church was built as a copy of the church in Gablonz). The city of Gablonz is considering to re-erect a copy of the fountain. Some Czech historians are the opinion that the original fountain -now in Kaufbeuren- should be returned to Gablonz.

In 1905 Metzler created 20 atlants at the facade of the Zachlerhaus in Vienna. The design of the atlants goes back to the model ‘Alter Mann‘ which Metzler displayed a year earlier at the ‘XX. Ausstellung der Vereinigung Bildener Künstler Österreichs Secession‘, Vienna, 1904. In 1906 Metzner created for the city of Reichenberg a monumental fountain group with a ‘Lichtträger’ (‘Bearer of Light’), for the city of Linz the Stelzhammer-memorial, and for the city Teplitz a memorial to Kaiser Joseph II.

‘Denkmal Kaiser Joseph II’, city of Teplitz
Kaiser Joseph II was the Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790, and sole ruler of the Habsburg Lands. The memorial was revealed in 1906 in the city of Teplitz (now Teplice, Czech Republic). The sculpture of Kaiser Joseph II was broken down at 10 November 1920, shortly after the end of WWI. However, the two flanking sculptures ‘Industry’ and ‘Agriculture’ by Metzner remained. The Kaiser Joseph figure was later replaced by a statue of Mozart. Today only the 50 meter long row of small reliefs by Metzer exists.

Another striking sculpture by Metzler is the ‘Ringer’ (‘Wrestler’), created around 1906. At least three different models of the Ringer exist. One executed in ceramic is in the possession of the Ostdeutsche Galerie in Regensburg (height 31 cm). The figures were displayed at the exhibitions ‘Kunstschau’, Vienna, 1908; ‘Berliner Secession’, 1908; ‘Internationale Kunstausstellung Rom’, 1911; ‘Sudetendeutsche Kunstausstellung Berlin’, 1937; and ‘Sudetendeutsche Kunstausstellung Dresden’, 1938.
From 1905 to 1907 Metzler worked on numerous sculptures for the ‘Weinhaus Rheingold’ in Berlin.

The Weinhaus Rheingold, the legenday art temple in Berlin,  ‘A holy place of great, serious and truly German art’
The Weinhaus Rheingold in the Potsdamer Straße 3 in Berlin, built between 1905 and 1907, was designed by Bruno Schmitz. The numerous sculptures were by Franz Metzner and Hermann Feuerhahn. The building of this large scale wine restaurant extended over 5000 square meter and was ‘created as a holy place of great, serious and truly German art’. Clients were the well to do middle classes. Weinhaus Rheingold was an amazing place for size, being a large five-story structure crowded from the ground floor to the roof with art and dining chambers of different sizes. Many of the rooms, or halls, were truly imposing, very large, hung with grate glass-spangled chandeliers, set with pockets lights, finished in bronze, steel and fine marbles. De building was destroyed by bombing in 1944.  Several sculptures were depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration’, 1907.

In 1911 Metzner created several sculptures and reliefs for the building of the Viennese Banking Association in Prague.  In the same year the Stocklet Palais in Brussels was completed. The palais, a turning point in Art Nouveau, features works by Koloman Moser, Gustav Klimt and Franz Metzner. 

Stoclet Palais, Brussel
When banker and art collector Adolphe Stoclet commissioned this house from one of the leading architects of the Vienna Secession movement, Josef Hoffmann, in 1905, he imposed neither aesthetic nor financial restrictions on the project. The house and garden were completed in 1911 and their austere geometry marked a turning point in Art Nouveau, foreshadowing Art Deco and the Modern Movement in architecture. Stoclet House is one of the most accomplished and homogenous buildings of the Vienna Secession, and features works by Koloman Moser, Gustav Klimt and Franz Metzner, embodying the aspiration of creating a ‘total work of art’ (Gesamtkunstwerk). Bearing testimony to artistic renewal in European architecture, the house retains a high level of integrity, both externally and internally as it retains most of its original fixtures and furnishings. Stoclet House is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2009. Inter alia the eccentric four sculptures on top of the house are by Franz Metzner.

Two years after the completion of the Stocklet Palais, Metzner created the sculptures above the entrance and at the façade of the Cines Nollendorf Theater, Nollendorfplatz 4 in Berlin. The theater, built in 1912/13 and renamed ‘Ufa-Pavillon’ in 1927, was destroyed in an air raid in 1943.
One of the most well known works by Metzler, are the sculptures of the Völkerschlachtdenkmal, a huge memorial designed by the architect Bruno Schmitz in Leipzig. The monument was inaugurated in 1913 by Kaiser Wilhelm II. It is a unique and imposing combination of Wilhelmine and Jugendstil styles.

Monument to the Battle of the Nations
The biggest monument in Europe

The Monument to the Battle of the Nations (Völkerschlachtdenkmal) is a monument in Leipzig, Germany, to the 1813 Battle of Leipzig, also known as the Battle of the Nations. Paid for mostly by donations and the city of Leipzig, it was completed in 1913 for the 100th anniversary of the battle at a cost of six million goldmarks. The monument commemorates Napoleon’s defeat at Leipzig, a crucial step towards the end of hostilities in the War of the Sixth Coalition. The coalition armies of Russia, Prussia, Austria and Sweden were led by Tsar Alexander I of Russia and Karl Philipp, Prince of Schwarzenberg. There were Germans fighting on both sides, as Napoleon’s troops also included conscripted Germans from the left bank of the Rhine annexed by France, as well as troops from his German allies of the Confederation of the Rhine. It was the first massed battle in the history of the world: all the nations of Europe were represented on the battlefield. It was also the scene of fighting in World War II, when Nazi forces in Leipzig made their last stand against U.S. troops. 
Except for the figure of Archangel Michael (done by Christian Behrens ⧾ 1905), all the sculptures of the Völkerschlachtdenkmal are by Franz Metzner. Inside, the monument contains two floors. The first floor is known as the crypt, although no one is buried there, and features 8 stone statues. These 8 ‘Schicksalmasken’ (‘Masks of Fate’) represent fallen warriors in the form of massive medieval knights who are each flanked by two other figures known as ‘Totenwächter’ (Guards of the Dead). The second story, known as the ‘Ruhmeshalle’ (Hall of Fame) contains four more giant figures of each 9.5 meters high, representing the four legendary historic qualities ascribed to the German people: bravery, faith, sacrifice, and fertility. Twelve ‘Wächterfiguren’ (Guards) by Metzner, each 13 meter high, are encircling the dome of the Völkerschlachtdenkmal. Up in the circle of the dome (68 meters high) is a series of 324 riders returning  home. Another 94 sculptures by Metzner are integrated in the stone frames of the stained-glass windows.
The Monument was inaugurated in 1913 by Kaiser Wilhelm II. It is unique and imposing combination of Wilhelmine and Jugendstil styles.

In 1914 Metzler created the sculptures above the entrance and on the façade of the Volsbühne in Berlin. The theatre, designed by Oskar Kaufmann, was heaviliy damaged during World War II. From 1950 to 1954 it was rebuilt according to the design of architect Hans Richter. The sculptures are lost. 
Metzler, member of the Deutschen Künstlerbund, joined the Preussische Akademie der Künste in 1919. In the same year, at an age of 48, he died in Berlin from the Spanish Flu.
From November 1977 to August 1978 the exhibition ‘Franz Metzner, Ein Bildhauer der Jahrhunderdwende‘, took place in Berlin, Vienna, Prague and Leipzig.
From November 2006 to January 2007 the ‘North Bohemian Museum’ in Liberec (Czech Republic) hosted the exhibition ‘Franz Metzner, Skulptur und Architektur zwischen Jugendstill und Monument’.