Friedrich Stahl, S. Francesco in Fiesole

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Price: on request

Description

‘S. Francesco in Fiesole’ (‘Monastery of San Francesco in Fiesole’, near Florence, Italy)
By Karl Stahl, likely Hitlers most favorit contemporary painter.

  • displayed in the ‘Sonderschau’ of Friedrich Stahl at the GDK 1940;
  • bought by Adolf Hitler, who destined the painting for the ‘Führermuseum Linz’;
  • the painting, displayed at the GDK 1940, was on loan by the ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’. An authentic sticker on the back reads: ‘Besitzer: Herr Reichsleiter Martin Bormann, Obersalzberg’;
  • the painting was found back by Allied Troops in 1945 in the saltmines of Altaussee;
  • after WWII, at 25 October 1945, it was stored in the Central Collecting Point in Munich;
  • depicted in the ‘Völkischer Beobachter‘, 28 July 1940;
  • with original frame.

Original sticker on the back with the text:
‘Francesco Fiesole
von Professor Friedrich Stahl
Besitzer: Herr Reichsleiter Martin Bormann, Obersalzberg’

‘S. Francesco in Fiesole’, displayed with 34 other work by Stahl in the Sonderschau of the GDK 1940.

‘Sonderschau’
The ‘Sonderschau’ at the GDK was the most important tool for singling out highly valued artists. It was a special exhibition that gathered works of a single artist each year in one room, usually adjoining the main areas downstairs. In 1938, on instructions of Hitler, the GDK mounted a special display of paintings by Werner Peiner (21 works). In 1939 the painter Arthur Kampf was honored with a Sonderschau (17 works), in 1940 Friedrich Stahl (35 works), 1941 Raffael Schuster-Woldan (27 works), 1942 Karl Leipold (22 works), 1943 Peter Philippi (35 works), and finally in 1944 Hugo Gugg (21 works).

‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’
The ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’ was the Obersalzberg administrative headquarters, headed by Martin Bormann, who gradually built the department up to a kind of second Regierungssitz (Seat of Government). Bormann was also the Head of the Nazi Party Chancellery and private secretary to Hitler.
In his role as Head of the ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’, Bormann, the ‘Majordomo’ of the Obersalzberg, was frequently instructed by Hitler to acquire paintings and other works of art.

Führermuseum
The Führermuseum, also referred to as the ‘Linz Art Gallery’, was an unrealized art museum planned by Adolf Hitler for his hometown, the Austrian city of Linz, near his birthplace of Braunau. Its purpose was to display a selection of the art bought, confiscated or stolen by the Nazis from throughout Europe during World War II.
Hitler personally favored German and Austrian paintings from the 19th century, but the Linz-collection also contained many early German, Dutch, French, and Italian paintings. The collection, when it was whole, included 4,731 pieces, not just paintings but also tapestries, sculpture, furniture and porcelain.
The overall plan was to turn Linz into a cultural capital of Nazi Germany and one of the greatest art centers of Europe, overshadowing Vienna, for which Hitler had a personal distaste. The expected completion date for the project was 1950, however the Führermuseum was never build.
Beginning February 1944, the artworks destined for Linz (‘Sonderauftrag Linz’) were relocated to the 14th-century Steinberg salt mines above the village of Altaussee (Aüssee), in which the holdings of various Viennese museums had earlier been transferred.
Hitler bought almost 40 works by Stahl of which 23, including ‘S. Francesco in Fiesole’, were destined for the Führermuseum. This was quite extraordinary, as the collection contained very few works at all of contemporary artist (the handfull of other contemporary artists on the Linz-list, were represented only with one or two works).

Archiv property cards from the Munich Central Collecting Point. The painting ‘S. Francesco in Fiesole’ is described as: ‘F. Stahl: Cathedral – porch with figure approaching’. The handwritten text on the card reads: ’Statement of mr. Heim, Munich 4 April 1951, to the American CCP: according to a friend of Friedrich Stahl (Evangilsti in Rome?) the painting was acquired by Consul Kluxer for the Linz Museum. In the right upper corner the location where the Allied troops found ‘S. Francesco in Fiesole’ in 1945: ‘Aussee’.

Heinrich Heim (1900 – 1988)
The Munich lawyer Heinrich Heim, who had known Adolf Hitler since 1920, was appointed to the Brown House in 1933 by Rudolf Hess, where he dealt with legislative questions, until he was transferred to the ‘Führer’s headquarters’ in 1939 as Martin Bormann’s adjutant.
Hitler himself sent Heinrich Heim, who had expertise in paintings and graphics, on trips to Italy and France to buy artworks, which Hitler initially paid for with his own money, which came i.a. from sales of Mein Kampf and royalties. Heim was a great admirer of the painters Karl Leipold and Friedrich Stahl.
Probably on the advice of Heinrich Heim Hitler acquired after 1933 dozens of works by Stahl; 23 of them were later destined for the never-realised Führermuseum (source: Heinrich Heim, 1970, who conformed he took care of the paintings, in ‘Adolf Hitler, Legende-Mythos-Wirklichkeit, by Werner Maser, 2001). 38 Stahl-works were in 1945 discovered by Allied troops in the salt mines of Altaussee (Aussee) and brought back to the CCP Munich.
After the war Heinrich Heim was interned by the US military government as a former Nazi until the end of 1948.

Heinrich Heim, 1973, standing in front of ‘Deutsche Balade’, a GDK- painting by Karl Leipold, bought by Hitler for 10,000 Reichsmark.

‘S. Francesco in Fiesole‘ by Stahl, depicted in the ‘Völkischer Beobachter‘, 28 July 1940.
   

‘S. Francesco in Fiesole’, 2024.

 

– condition : II
– size : 71 x 57 cm; unframed 56 x 43 cm
– signed : right, below : ‘Friedrich Stahl Florence’
– type : oil on board

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BIOGRAPHY: FRIEDRICH STAHL

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Träumerei’ (‘Dreamimg’), second version, 1938. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich‘, 1939.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Frauenkopf’ (‘Head of a Woman’), 1937. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1939.
    

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Frauenkopf’, depicted again in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943, under the name ‘Mädchen mit Pelz’ (‘Girl with Fur’).

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Jungbrunnen‘ (’Fountain of Youth’). Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1922/23.
The Fountain of Youth is a mythical spring which allegedly restores the youth of anyone who drinks or bathes in its waters. Tales of such a fountain have been recounted around the world for thousands of years, appearing in the writings of Herodotus (5th century BC), in the Alexander romance (3rd century AD), and in the stories of Prester John (early Crusades, 11th/12th centuries AD).

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Sertaldo’, village in Tuscany, Italy. Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1922/23.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Die heilige Elisabeth‘ (‘The Holy Elisabeth‘). Depicted in the art magazine ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23.
   

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Liebesgarten‘ (‘Garden of Love‘). Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23. Again depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Mantua‘ (‘city of Mantua‘). Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Nucche’ (‘Knockles’). Displayed at the ‘Kunstausstellung München’, 1931; depicted in the exhibition catalog.
Friedrich Stahl, ‘Die Freundinnen’ (‘Friends’). Around 1930. Size 34 x 27 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2013.
 

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Dekameron‘. Size 93 x 96 cm (lost). Displayed at the ‘Münchener Jahrsausstellung 1916 im Königlichen Glaspalast‘. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1916/17, and in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23. Bought by Hitler in 1940; destined for the Führermuseum.
The Decameron is a collection of short stories by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men; they shelter in a secluded villa just outside Florence in order to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. Boccaccio probably conceived the Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Triumpf des Eros’ (‘Triumph of Eros’). GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23.
Below: ‘Triumph des Eros’, depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1916/17.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Ausfahrt in Venedig‘ (‘Tour in Venice‘). GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1922/23, and in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1909, and later again in 1939/40. Also displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’, 1909. Size 36 x 34 cm. Bought in 1940 by Hitler; destined for the Führermuseum.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Am Rosenhag’ (‘At the Rosebush’). Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23.
   

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Rinascimento’ (‘Renaissance’), around 1905. Oil on wood. Size 31 x 45 cm. GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Leigabe der ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1940/41. Since 1956 in the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen/ Pinakothek.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Aricca bei Altano‘ (‘city of Ariccia, near Albano’/ Rome). GDK 1937 room 34. ‘In the possession of Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring‘. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutsche Reich‘, 1940. Earlier displayed at the ‘Grosse Münchener Kunstausstellung 1936’.
Right: ‘Aricca bei Altano‘ by Stahl, displayed at the ‘Münchener Kunstausstellung im Glaspalast’, 1927. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1927.
 

Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Die Sieger’ (‘The Victors’). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943.

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Val D’Arno’ (‘Valley of the River Arno’, Tuscany). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Die Engelsbrücke in Rom‘ (‘Ponte Sant’Angelo in Rome‘), GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau), on loan by the ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg‘. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1940. Since 1956 in the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen/ Pinakothek. Size 35 x 28 cm.
Right: ‘Die Engelsbrücke in Rom’ (and a detail of ‘Die Täufer’),  depicted in the ‘Dresdner Nachrichten’, 1 October 1940.
 

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Buondelmontes Treubruch’ (‘The Breach of Faith by Buondelmonte’). Displayed at the ‘Münchener Kunstausstellung‘, Glaspalast, 1917. Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’ 1939.
Buondelmonte of Florence, whose breach of faith with a lady of the Amidei family, whom he had promised to marry, led to his murder by the outraged Amidei at the foot of the statue of Mars on the Ponte Vecchio in 1215.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Zyklamen’ (‘cyclamen’), GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1940. Also displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’, 1916.
Right: ‘Zyklamen’ by Stahl, depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, 1938.
 

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Andante‘ (a tempo mark directing that a music passage is to be played in a moderately slow tempo; faster than adagio but slower than moderato). Crated 1906. GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1940/41, and later in ‘Kunst in Deutschland 1933 – 1945‘, Mortimer G. Davidson, 1991. Also displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’, 1906. Bought by Hitler in 1940; destined for the Führermuseum. Found back in 1945 by Allied Troops in the saltmines of Altaussee, then stored in the CCP Munich.
Right: depicted under the name ‘Jugend’ (‘Youth’) in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, 1938. 

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Abundancia‘. GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst in Dritten Reich‘, 1938.
Also displayed at the ‘Allgemeine Kunstausstellung München 1926 im Glaspalast‘.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Die Glücksjäger’ (‘Fortune Hunter’), 1911/12. Size 63 x 52 cm. Displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’, 1913, and at the ‘Münchener Jahrsausstellung 1916 im Königlichen Glaspalast‘ (depicted in the exhibition catalog and in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1916/17).  Bought in 1940 by Hitler; destined for the Führermuseum. Since 1959 in the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen/ Pinakothek.
   

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Eris’, the Greek goddess of Strife and Discord. GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1940/41.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Dämmerung‘ (‘Twilight‘). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst in Dritten Reich‘, 1938.
   

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Iris und Tulpen’ (‘Iris and Tulips’). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943. Displayed at the ‘Münchener Jahrsausstellung 1916 im Königlichen Glaspalast‘. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1916/17.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Erwartung’ (‘Expectation’). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943. Displayed at the ‘Münchener Jahrsausstellung 1916 im Königlichen Glaspalast‘.

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Monte Porzio bei Rom‘. Monte Porzio, a municipality in the Province of Pesaro e Urbino, Italy. Size 31 x 30 cm. Displayed at the ‘Münchener Jahresausstellung im Glaspalast‘, 1927. In the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen.

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Frauenkopf’ (‘Head of a Woman’). Displayed at the ‘Allgemeine Kunstausstellung München 1926 im Glaspalast‘. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1926.

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Frühling um Trinità de‘ Monti‘ (‘The Church of Santissima Trinità dei Monti, in Springtime’). The tekst below the picture reads: ‘In the possession of the Stadt Galerie München’. GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutsche Reich’, 1939.
Right: ‘Frühling um Trinità de‘ Monti‘ by Stahl, since 1959 in the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen/ Pinakothek. Size 32 x 28 cm.
 

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Villa Borghese’. ‘Villa Borghese’ is a landscape garden in Rome, containing a number of buildings, museums and attractions. It is the third-largest public park in Rome. GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1940/41.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Herodias’, 1911. Size 65 x 54 cm (lost). Herodias (15 BC – AD 39), princess of the Herodian dynasty of Judaea during the time of the Roman Empire. Christian writings connect her with the execution of John the Baptist. Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23. Earlier depicted under the name ‘Der Tanz der Salome’ (‘Dance of Salome’) in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1916/17. Size  65 x 54 cm. Bought by Hitler; destined for the Führermuseum.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Prato Vecchio’. Pratovecchio, village in Tuscany. Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Tanz der Salome’, sold by a German auction house in 2017 and again in 2024. Size 83 x 85 cm.
Right: ‘Prato Vecchi’ by Stahl, depicted again in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943.
   

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Selbstbildnis 1917’ (‘Selportrait 1917’). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Spello’ (‘Spello’, village in Umbria, Italy). GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). In the possession of the ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, 1938.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Alte Bäuerin‘ (‘Old Farmer‘). Displayed under the name of ‘Bäuerin am Ammrsee’ at the GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). In the possession of the ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, 1938.

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Improvisator’, 1906. Size 92 x 88 cm. GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Also displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’, 1906 (bought then by the Nationalgalerie Berlin) and again at the ‘Kollektivausstellung Friedrich Stahl, 1939 Künstlerhaus Berlin, organised by the ‘Hauptstelle Bildende Kunst im Amt des Beauftragten des Führers für die gesamte geistige und weltanschauliche Erziehung der NSDAP‘. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, 1939, and in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1940/41. The work was lost in 1945 in the flak tower Friedrichshain.

Friedrich Stahl, detail of ‘Der Täufer‘ (‘The Baptizer‘), GDK 1940 room 3 (Sonderschau). Depicted in the ‘Salzburger Volksblatt’, 28 August 1940.
Below: ‘Der Täufer’ by Stahl, depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1916/17.

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Präludium‘ (‘Prelude‘). Displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstllung‘, 1909. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle‘, 1909.

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Parzival‘ (‘Percival‘), 1905. Size 154 x 50 cm. Displayed at the ’IX. Internationalen Kunstausstellung im Kgl. Glaspalast zu München’, 1905. A second version was displayed at the ‘Münchener Jahrsausstellung 1916 im Königlichen Glaspalast‘; depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1916/17.
The 1905 version was acquired in 1940 by Adolf Hitler who donated it in 1942 to the Neue Pinakothek in Munich.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Landschaft‘ (‘Landscape‘). Depicted in ‘Jugend‘, 1924, Heft 3, Page 57.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Venus und Merkur‘ (‘Venus and Mercury‘). Depicted in ‘Jugend‘, 1924, Heft 4, Page 78.   

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Florentinerin’ (‘Woman of Florence‘), 1901. Size 30 x 25 cm. Bought in 1940 by Hitler; destined for the Führermuseum.

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Eva und Adam‘. Displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung‘, 1910. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, 1910, and again in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte‘, 1922/23. Size 107 x 71 cm.  Bought by Hitler; destined for the Führermuseum.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Blick auf Triberg‘ (‘View at Triberg in Schwarzwald‘). Depicted in 1894 in a German art magazine (Verlag Bong).
   

Left: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Am Teetisch’ ‘(‘Tea Table’), created in 1887. Bought by Hitler in 1940, and destined for the Führermuseum. Later stolen from the CCP depot in Munich.
Right: Friedrich Stahl, ‘Regatta in Henley’, signed 1899. Oil on wood. Size 73 x 72 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2011 for 148,500 Euro.
   

Friedrich Stahl, ‘Schluss der Saison‘ (‘End of Season’), 1886. Size 101 x 167 cm.
In November 1942 Heinrich Heim asked Bormann to prevent a possible rise in market prices in view of the imminent sale of the painting ‘Schluss der Saison’; the painting was finally bought by Bormann, on behalf of Hitler, at 4 December 1942 at the Weimüller auction for 50,000 Reichsmark.
Since 1957 in the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen/ Pinakothek.

Grave of Friedrich Stahl.
Stahl died on 12 July 1940 in Rome. At the funeral celebrated at the chapel of the prestigious Cimitero Acattolico in Rome, d.d. 16 July, a swastika covered the coffin and Bernhard Rust (German Minister of Education, Science and National Culture) and Alfred Rosenberg, Head of the Foreign Affairs Office of the NSDAP, sent wreaths. In his funeral address Hoppenstedt (director of the ‘Section dedicated to scientific cultural research’ of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for art history and cultural studies, the Bibliotheca Hertziana) described Stahl to the numerous Nazi representatives present as ‘the most patriotic German imaginable’, ‘a hater of the English’, and ‘Party sympathizer proud of our great victories’. Notable too was the support of the German Ambassador for his burial in the Old Cemetry ‘reserved exclusively for outstanding men’. The Tombstone was commissioned by Adolf Hitler to the sculptor Walter Rössler.
Right: the grave of Friedrich Stahl depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1943. The text below the picture reads: ‘Commissioned by the Führer to the sculptor Walter Rössler’.
 

Friedrich Stahl, date of photo unknown.

Friedrich Stahl, Hitlers most favorit contemporary painter.
Friedrich Stahl, born in 1863 in Munich as the son of a publisher, was a German illustrator, and painter noted for his Naturalistic style, influenced by the Quattrocento and ‘Pre Raphaelites’. At the age of 15, he went to the Munich Academy in 1878 where he studied under Wilhelm Diez, Ludwig von Lofftz and Gyula Benczur. In 1886 he went to Berlin, were his work ‘Schluss der Saison’ (‘End of Season’) became his first success. Other works followed, like ‘Unter den Linden’, ‘Graveyard in Snow’, and ‘Paris Flower Parade’ (1897), acquired by the Berlin Nationalgalerie. In this early period his themes were focussed around the bourgeois-aristocratic upper class; boulevards, city squares, soirées and balls, the life and zeitgeist of the German Belle Epoque.
In 1892 he was among the founders of the oppositional Art Association ‘XI’, in which Max Liebermann, Ludig von Hofmann and Walter Leistikow also participated.
In 1898 Stahl moved to England, where he studied the ‘Pre Raphaelites’ and created ‘Regatta in Henley’. Two years later he moved to Rome, where he had a studio in Villa Borghese, and from 1904 to 1913 he lived in Florence, where he studied pre-Renaissance painting (i.a. Botticelli). In this period, a radical change took place in his oeuvre, which from now on was influenced by the Quattrocento both stylistically and thematically. Images of religious, mythological and allegorical or literary content executed in the old master glaze technique; in the mystical, dreamy scenes, the feeling of quiet sadness for the beauty of a bygone era is omnipresent. In 1906 Stahl participated at the ‘Esposizione internationale di Milano’, Italy. Exhibitions in Bremen and Düsseldorf followed.
In 1913 Stahl went back to Bavaria, where he opened a studio in Feldafing, at the Starnberg lake. He stayed there for 10 years; in 1924 he returned to Rome where he lived and worked until his death in 1940.
His painting style continued to be inspired by Impressionism but also by the 15th century Italians and the Pre-Raphaelities. As illustrator, Stahl worked amongst others for the ‘Fliegende Blätter’ magazine, ‘Gartenlaube‘, ‘Die Moderne Kunst’, Goethe’s Faust and Heine’s ‘Buch der Lieder‘.
From 1925 to 1940, Stahl was a member of the ‘Preußische Akademie der Künste’ in Berlin. He was awarded the title professor (date unknown).

Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung and Munich-Glaspalast exhibitions
Stahl took part at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung‘ in i.a. 1906, 1907, 1909, 1910, 1912, 1913 and 1916. In 1905 he was represented in the Glaspalast in Munich. At the ‘Münchener Jahresausstellung 1916 im Königlichen Glaspalast‘ he displayed 16 works. In 1917 he displayed 20 works in the Glaspalast. Later, he was again represented in the Munich Glaspalast in 1926, 1927, 1929, 1930. In 1931 and 1932 he showed his works in the ‘Kunstausstellung München‘ in the Deutsches Museum, and in 1934 and 1936 at the ‘Grosse Münchener Kunstausstellung‘ in the Neue Pinakothek.

At 9 February 1939, a Friedrich Stahl exhibition at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institut, Palazzo Zuccari, in Rome, opened its doors. The exhibition, co-organised by the ‘Hauptstelle Bildende Kunst im Amt des Beauftragten des Führers für die gesamte geistige und weltanschauliche Erziehung der NSDAP‘ (the ‘Amt Rosenberg‘), showed 37 oil-paintings, 26 watercolours  and 28 drawings by Stahl. The exhibition was inaugurated by the German ambassador Von Mackensen and the Italian Minister of Education Giuseppe Bottai. Several displayed works by Stahl were on loan by Martin Bormann and possible also by Heinrich Himmler.
The Italian exhiition was shorlty later followed by the ‘Kollektivausstellung Friedrich Stahl‘, held on 15 April 1939 – 14 Mai 1939 in the Künstlerhaus Berlin, again organised by the ‘Hauptstelle Bildende Kunst im Amt des Beauftragten des Führers für die gesamte geistige und weltanschauliche Erziehung der NSDAP‘.

The rediscovery of Stahl in Nazi Germany was due to Hitler himself. Probably on the advice of Heinrich Heim, assistant to Martin Bormann, Hitler acquired after 1933 dozens of works by Stahl; 23 of them later destined for the never-realised Führermuseum (source: Heinrich Heim, 1970, who conformed he took care of the paintings, in ‘Adolf Hitler, Legende-Mythos-Wirklichkeit, by Werner Maser, 2001). 38 Stahl-works were in 1945 discovered by Allied troops in the salt mines of Altaussee (Aussee) and brought back to the CCP Munich.
Heim (1900 – 1988), a great admirer of the painters Karl Leipold and Friedrich Stahl, was frequently send by Hitler himself to Italy and France to buy art works. Other senior Nazi’s such as Himmler, Göring and Goebbels, were also in the possession of works by Stahl.

In April 1940, Stahl received the Goethe Medal (the highest German recognition for the arts and sciences), at the proposal of the director of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut in Rome, Werner Hoppenstadt, supported by Martin Bormann. The Medal was presented by the German Ambassador in Rome, Hans Georg von Mackensen, at the command of Goebbels and Hitler.

At the Great German Art Exhibitions, Stahl was represented with 40 paintings, 28 watercolors and 6 drawings. In 1940, 34 of his paintings (and the watercolors and drawings) were shown at the GDK in a ‘Sonderschau’. Several displayed works in the Sonderschau were on loan by the ‘Nationalgalerie Berlin’, the ‘Verwaltung Obersalzberg’, the ‘Reichsministerium für Volksaufklärung und Propaganda’, Berlin, and the ‘Städtische Galerie’ Berlin.
Hitler also bought in 1940 three works by Stahl, i.a. ‘Am Teetisch’ ‘(‘Tea Table’, 1887), for the Reichs Chancellery.

Stahl died on 12 July 1940 in Rome.
At the funeral celebrated at the chapel of the prestigious Cimitero Acattolico in Rome, d.d. 16 July, a swastika covered the coffin and Bernhard Rust (German Minister of Education, Science and National Culture) and Alfred Rosenberg, Head of the Foreign Affairs Office of the NSDAP, sent wreaths. In his funeral address Hoppenstedt (director of the ‘Section dedicated to scientific cultural research’ of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for art history and cultural studies, the Bibliotheca Hertziana) described Stahl to the numerous Nazi representatives present as ‘the most patriotic German imaginable’, ‘a hater of the English’, and ‘Party sympathizer proud of our great victories’. Notable too was the support of the German Ambassador for his burial in the Old Cemetry ‘reserved exclusively for outstanding men’. The Tombstone was commissioned by Adolf Hitler to the sculptor Walter Rössler.
After Stahls death he was still favoured by the Nazis. In May 1941 Hitler still bought a work by Stahl for 35,000 Reichsmark. In November 1942 Heinrich Heim asked Bormann to prevent a possible rise in market prices in view of the imminent sale of the painting ‘Schluss der Saison’ (the work from 1886); the painting was finally bought by Bormann, on behalf of Hitler, at 4 December 1942 at the Weimüller auction for 50,000 Reichsmark. Bormann bought again a work by Stahl in March 1943. Die ‘Kunst im Deutschen Reich‘ published a broad article about Stahl in 1943.

Stahl was very well covered by the press: the art magazines ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’ (i.a. 1922), ‘Die Kunst für Alle’ and ‘Die Kunst im Dritten/Deutschen Reich’ (1938, 1939, 1940, 1943), all published extensive articles about Stahl and his works.
The Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen/ Pinakothek still holds 12 works by Stahl, including ‘End of Season’.