Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, Rest in the Heather

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‘Rast in der Heide’ (‘Rest in the Heather’)
Displayed at the GDK 1943 room 4. 
Bought by Joseph Goebbels for 10.000 Reichsmark.
At the backside remains of the authentic red-white twisted cord of the GDK-medal.

Left: at the backside: remains of the authentic red-white twisted cord and staple.
Right: an original GDK-medal (unknown from which work).
   

‘Rast in der Heide’, by Sluyterman von Langeweyde, displayed at the GDK 1943 room 4.

Left: ‘Rast in der Heide’, by Sluyterman von Langeweyde, depicted in the 1943-GDK exhibition catalog.
Right: ‘Rast in der Heide’, by Sluyterman von Langeweyde, depicted in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, 1943.   

‘Rast in der Heide‘, depicted in ‘Hitlerova Sbirka V Cechach‘, by Jiri Kuchar, 2012.

– condition : II
– size : 122 x 95 cm
– signed : below, in the middle
– type : oil on wood

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BIOGRAPHY: GEORG SLUYTERMAN VON LANGEWEYDE

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Auf einsame Heide’ (‘On lonely Heath‘), GDK 1944 room 15. Size 147 x 152 cm. Bought by Joseph Goebbels for 14,000 Reichsmark. In the possession of the German Historical Museum, Berlin.

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langenweyde, ‘1928 im Kohlenrevier’ (‘1928 in the Mining District’). GDK 1939 room 27. Oil on board. Bought by the Reichskanzlei for 5,000 Reichsmark. 
Right: ‘1928 im Kohlenrevier’ by Sluyterman von Langeweyde, depicted in ‘Das Bild’, 1940. Again depicted in ‘Adel der Arbeit’, Peter Schirmbeck, 1984, and in ‘Kunst in Deutschland 1933-1945’, Mortimer G. Davidson, 1992.
 

Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
In the beginning of 1944, Dr. Hans Reger (architect in charge of the Führerbau, Munich 1938-1945) shipped in several transports 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection -and other stolen art collections- to the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.
After the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Art works then considered as having no value, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind. They were photographed in August 1945 by the former director of the Czech State Institute of Photometry, Antonín Friedl, along with the photographer Jan Tuháček. ‘In der Lüneburger Heide‘  by Sluyterman von Langweyde was one of the paintings
at the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Later, the art works previously owned by Hitler, ended up scattered across the country.
Since 2012, twenty-three paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found back at various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered at the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. One painting was found at the Military Institute in Prague, and four works were found at the Sychrov Castle. Four other paintings were found in the building of the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.
Three larges bronzes were found back at the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery: ‘The Rower’ by Hermann Zettlitzer, ‘Aphrodite‘ by Wilhelm Wandschneider, and ‘The Sower‘ by Willi Knapp.
All the twenty-three paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.
‘In der Lüneburger Heide‘ by Sluyterman von Langweyde still hangs in the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘In der Lüneburger Heide‘ (‘In the Lüneburg Heath‘). Oil. Displayed at the GDK 1943 room 25. Bought by Hitler for 8,000 Reichsmark. Nowadays located at the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.
Right: ‘In der Lüneburger Heide’ by Sluyterman von Langeweyde, as it was found in 1945 in the Czech Republic, -Monastery of Hohenfurt. Depicted in the ‘Hitlerova Sbirka v Cechach’, by Jiri Kuchar, 2012.   

Georg Sluytermann von Langeweyde, ‘In Niedersachsen‘ (‘In Lower Saxony‘), displayed at the GDK 1944 room 15. Size 125 x 170 cm. Depicted in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, 1944.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Bauernbub und Gemüse‘ (‘Farmer-son and Vegetables‘). Size 57 x 71 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2017.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Der junge Fiedermann’ (‘The Young Violin Player’), 1955. Size 100 x 100 cm. Oil on board. Sold by a German auction house in 1999.
Right: depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.
   

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Rückenakt‘ (‘Nude on the back‘), 1953. Size 64 x 49 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2021.
Left: depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.
   

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Frau am Gemüsetich‘ (‘Woman at Table with Vegetables‘), around 1950. Size 80 x 100 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 1999.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Schnitterin’ (‘Female Grim Reaper’), 1954. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Schnitter’ (‘Grim Reaper’), 1954. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Auf der Walz’ (‘On Journey’), 1951. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Series: ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied’ (‘Song of the German People’), 1935
In 1935, Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde created ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied’, a series of 10 lino prints.
In room 29 of the GDK 1937, Sluyterman von Langeweyde displayed a series of 12 lino prints under the name ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied’. The numbers XI and XII are assumable coming from the Sluyterman von Langeweyde’s series ‘Der Führer Spricht’, the numbers IV respectively V of that series (Marlies Schmidt, ‘Die Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstelling 1937 im Haus der Deutschen Kunst zu München’, Halle, 2010).
Eight works of the series are depicted in ‘Nationalzosialistische Monatshefte’, Heft 95, 1938. 

I. ‘Gesegn dich Laub, gesegn dich Gras, gesegn dich alles, was da was, ich muß von hinnen scheiden‘. ’Bless you, leaves, bless you, grass, bless you everything that ever was, for now I have to go’, 16th century folk song.

II. ‘Es blies ein Jäger wohl in sein Horn, und alles was er blies das war verlorn‘. ’A hunter blew into his horn, and everything he blew was lost’, quote by Achim von Arnim (1781 – 1831).

III. ‘Es freit ein wilder Wassermann, in der Burg wohl über dem See, des Königs Tochter will er han, die schöne, junge Lilofee‘. ‘A wild watermann is courting, in front of the castle across the lake, he’s courting in royal manner, the beautiful, young Lilofay’, 18th century folk song.

IV. ‘Drei Lilien, drei Lilien, die pflanzt’ ich auf mein Grab, da kam ein stolzer Reiter, und brach sie ab‘. ‘Three lilies, three lilies, I planted on my grave, then a proud rider came, and picked them up’, 19th century folk song.

V. ‘Wir zogen in das Feld, da hätten wir weder Säckl noch Geld, strampedemi alami presente, alvostra signori‘. We marched towards the battlefields, having neither bags nor money, It’s calling me to arms, I’m fighting on your side, gentlemen!’, one of the oldest known ‘Landsknechtlieder’, narrated by 1509 from the Italian campaigns Emperor Charles V.

VI. ‘Wo soll ich mich hinkehren, ich tumbes Brüderlein? Wie soll ich mich ernähren, mein Gut ist viel zu klein. Als ich ein Wesen han, so muss ich bald davon. Was ich soll heuer verzehren, das hab ich jüngst vertan‘. ‘Where shall I turn to, me, a poor man of the cloth, how should I take sustenance, my goods are way too few, my existence, I better leave soon, what I should eat today, I already ate up’, 16th century folk song.

VII. ‘Es reit ein Herr und auch sein Knecht, wohl üb’r eine Heide, die war schlecht, ja schlecht, und alles was sie red’ten da, war alls von einer wunderschönen Frauen, ja Frauen‘. ‘A Knight and squire, riding on the heath, in bad, bad weather, but the only thing they were talking about was a beautiful woman, yes women’, 16th century folk song. 

VIII. ‘Es ist ein Schnitter, heißt der Tod. Hat Gwalt vom großen Gott. Heut wetzt er das Messer, es schneidt schon viel besser, bald wird er drein schneiden, wir müssen´s nur leiden. Hüt dich, schöns Blümelein!’. ‘It is a reaper, called death. Has power from the great god. Today he’s sharpening the knife, it cuts already much better, soon he’ll cut into it, we just have to put up with it. Take care, pretty little flowers!’, 17th century folk song.

IX. ‘Gar Lieblich hat sich gesellet, mein Herz in kurzer Frist, zu einer, die mir gefället, Gott weiß wohl, wer sie ist, sie liebet mich ganz inniglich, die Allerliebste mein, in Treuen ich sie mein‘. ’My heart has become pleasantly wedded, within a very short time, to one who pleases me. God knows very well who she is. She loves me very tenderly, that sweetheart of mine, I think of her with constancy’, 16th century folk song.

X. ‘Es dunkelt schon in der Heide, nach Hause laßt uns gehn. Wir haben das Korn geschnitten mit unserm blanken Schwert‘. ‘It’s getting dark on the heath. Let’s go home. We have cut the grain with our naked sword’, old East Prussian folk song.

FLTR: the numbers I until X.|

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Schnitter Tod‘, woodcut print, number VIII from the series ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied 1935‘. Depicted in ‘Das Bauerliche Jahr‘, Karlsruhe, 1939. Displayed at the GDK 1937 room 27 as ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied VIII’.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Schnitter‘, woodcut print number X from the series ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied 1935‘. Depicted in ‘Das Bauerliche Jahr‘, Karlsruhe, 1939. 
Displayed at the GDK 1937 room 27 under the name ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied X’. 

Series: ‘Es mahnen die Väter (‘The Fathers are Warning’), 1936

I. ‘Sieg oder Unsieg ruht in Gottes Hand. Der Ehre sind wir selber Herr und König‘. ‘Victory or failure rests in God’s hands. We ourselves are lord and king of our honor’, written by Wilhelm Kube (1887 – 1943).

II. Und setzet ihr nicht das Leben ein, nie wird euch das Leben gewonnen sein‘. And if you don’t risk your life, your life will never be won’, Friedrich von Schiller (1795 – 1805).

III. ‘Frei will ich bleiben, und achte den Tod nicht‘. ’I want to stay Free, and despise Death’, quote by Ulrich von Hutten (1488 – 1523).

IV. ‘Helf Dir selber, dann, helft Dir auch unser Herre Gott’. ‘Help yourself, then our Lord God will help you too!’

V. ‘Frei auf deutschen Grunde walten. Laßt uns nach dem Brauch der Alten, Seines Segens selbst uns freun. Oder unser Grab ihn sein‘. ‘Free, on German soil, let us rule according to the custom of the ancients: even we rejoice in his blessing: or our grave be him!’, by Heinrich von Kleist (1777 – 1811).

VI. Steh und falle mit eignem Kopfe. Thu das Deine, und thu es frisch! Besser stolz an dem irdnen Topfe, als demüthig am goldnen Tisch‘. ‘ Stand and fall with your own head. Do what is yours and do it fresh! Better proud at the earthen pot than humble at the golden table’, quote by Ernst Moritz Arndt (1769 – 1860).

VII. ‘Und wenn Du an dem Kreuzweg stehst, und weißt nicht mehr, wo aus wo ein. Halte still, frag dein Gewissen erst! Es kann deutsch, Gottlob, Drum folg ihm fein!’ ‘And when you stand at the crossroads, and don’t remember where from where one. Hold still, ask your conscience first! It speaks German, thank God, so follow it carefully!’, Johann Peter Hebel (1760 – 1826).

VIII. ‘Wer nicht für freiheit sterben kann, der ist der Kette wert‘. ‘Those who are not prepared to die for freedom, are worth the chain’, Gottfried August Bürger (1747 – 1794).

Ad I. ‘Sieg oder Unsieg ruht in Gottes Hand. Der Ehre sind wir selber Herr und König‘. ‘Victory or failure rests in God’s hands. We ourselves are lord and king of our honor’, written by Wilhelm Kube (1887 – 1943), German politician and Nazi official, important figure in the German Christian movement during the early years of Nazi rule. Depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst der Gegenwart’, Werner Rittich, 1943. Also depicted in full page in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1941, and in ‘Das Bild des Herrschers in Malerei und Grafik des Nationalsozialismus’, Tobias Ronge, 2009. Likely displayed under the name ‘Ritter’ at the GDK 1938 room 29.
Right: another version of the same theme: ‘Der deutsche Stamm ist alt und stark, voll Hochgefühl und Glauben. Die Treue ist der Ehre Mark, Wankt nicht, wenn Stürme schnauben‘ (‘The German race is old and strong, full of high feeling and faith. Faitfulniss ist he marrow of honor, unwavering when storms race ‘), Friedrich Schlegel (1772-1829).
   

Ad II. ‘Und setzet ihr nicht das Leben ein, nie wird euch das Leben gewonnen sein‘. And if you don’t risk your life, your life will never be won’, Friedrich von Schiller (1795 – 1805). 
A print is in the possession of the US Army Center of Military History. Depicted full page in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, 1938. 

Ad III. (left) ‘Frei will ich bleiben, und achte den Tod nicht‘. ’I want to stay Free, and despise Death’, quote by Ulrich von Hutten (1488 – 1523). Likely displayed under the name ‘Tod und Landsknecht’ at the GDK 1938 room 29.
Right: inspired by Albrecht Dürer’s woodcut print ‘Der Tod und der Landsknecht‘, 1510 (in the possession of the British Museum). 
   

Ad IV. ‘Helf Dir selber, dann, helft Dir auch unser Herre Gott’. ‘Help yourself, then our Lord God will help you too!’ 

Ad V. (left) ‘Der Sähmann‘ (‘The Sower‘). Title page of ‘Das Bauerliche Jahr‘, Karlsruhe, 1939. The text reads: ‘Frei auf deutschen Grunde walten. Laßt uns nach dem Brauch der Alten, Seines Segens selbst uns freun. Oder unser Grab ihn sein‘. ‘Free, on German soil, let us rule according to the custom of the ancients: even we rejoice in his blessing: or our grave be him!’, by Heinrich von Kleist (1777 – 1811).
Displayed at the GDK 1938 room 29.
VI. (right) ‘Steh und falle mit eignem Kopfe. Thu das Deine, und thu es frisch! Besser stolz an dem irdnen Topfe, als demüthig am goldnen Tisch‘. ‘ Stand and fall with your own head. Do what is yours and do it fresh! Better proud at the earthen pot than humble at the golden table’, quote by Ernst Moritz Arndt (1769 – 1860). Likely displayed under the name ‘Ruhende Bauer’ at the GDK 1938 room 29.
   

Ad VII. (left) ‘Und wenn Du an dem Kreuzweg stehst, und weißt nicht mehr, wo aus wo ein. Halte still, frag dein Gewissen erst! Es kann deutsch, Gottlob, Drum folg ihm fein!’ ‘And when you stand at the crossroads, and don’t remember where from where one. Hold still, ask your conscience first! It speaks German, thank God, so follow it carefully!’, Johann Peter Hebel (1760 – 1826). Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.
VIII. (right) ‘Bundschufähnrich’, 1937. Flag-bearer of the Bundschuh movement, a series of localized peasant rebellions in southwestern Germany from 1493 to 1517. The text below reads: ‘Wer nicht für freiheit sterben kann, der ist der Kette wert‘. ‘Those who are not prepared to die for freedom, are worth the chain’, Gottfried August Bürger (1747 – 1794). Displayed under the name ‘Wehrhafter Bauer’ at the GDK 1938 room 29.
   


Series: ‘Der Führer Spricht’ (‘The Leader Speaks’), 1937
In 1937, Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde created ‘Der Führer Spricht’, a series of 6 lino prints. The numbers IV and V were assumable displayed at the GDK 1937 room 29 under the name of ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied XI and XII’.

The ‘Der Führer Spricht’ series included the following works:

I. ‘Es wird künftig nur noch einen Adel geben – den Adel der Arbeit’. ‘It will become in the Future Only One Nobility to Give – Nobility of Work’, quote by Adolf Hitler, 1933.

II. ‘Die Familie ist die kleinste, aber wertvollste Einheit im Aufbau des ganzen Staatsgefüges’. ‘The family is the smallest but most valuable unit in the construction of the whole state structure’, quote by Adolf Hitler, 1932.

III. ‘Es gibt keinen Aufstieg, der nicht beginnt bei der Wurzel des nationalen, völkischen und wirtschaftlichen Lebens, beim Bauern’. ‘There is no ascension that does not start at the roost of the national, folkisch and economic life: the farmers’, quote by Adolf Hitler, 1 May 1933.

IV. ‘Was ihr seid, seid ihr durch mich, aber was ich bin, bin ich nur durch euch’. Nr. IV. ‘Everything you want to be, you want to be through me; and everything I am, I am only because of you all’, speech of Hitler to the SA, d.d. 30 January 1936.

V. ‘Denn ihr, meine Jungen, ihr seid die lebenden Garanten Deutschlands, ihr seid das lebende Deutschland der Zukunft’. Nr. V. ‘You are the living Guarantors of Germany, you are the living Germany of the Future’, speech by Hitler in September 1933 to the Hitler Youth.

VI. ‘Wer seinem Volk so die Treue hielt, soll selbst in Treue nie vergessen sein’. ‘Who will be faithfull to the people, will be remembered for ever’.

Ad I. ‘Es wird künftig nur noch einen Adel geben – den Adel der Arbeit’. ‘At this time, there will be only one aristocracy, the aristocracy of work, labor, toil, and employment’, quote by Adolf Hitler, 1933. In the possession of the US Army Center of Military History. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Ad II. (left) ‘Die Familie ist die kleinste, aber wertvollste Einheit im Aufbau des ganzen Staatsgefüges’. ‘The family is the smallest but most valuable unit in the construction of the whole state structure’, quote by Adolf Hitler, 1932. Depicted in ‘Arts of the Third Reich’, Peter Adam, 1992.
III. (right) ‘Es gibt keinen Aufstieg, der nicht beginnt bei der Wurzel des nationalen, völkischen und wirtschaftlichen Lebens, beim Bauern’. ‘There is no ascension that does not start at the roost of the national, folkisch and economic life: the farmers’, quote by Adolf Hitler, 1 May 1933.
   

Ad IV. ‘Was ihr seid, seid ihr durch mich, aber was ich bin, bin ich nur durch euch’. ‘Everything you want to be, you want to be through me; and everything I am, I am only because of you all’, speech of Hitler to the SA, d.d. 30 January 1936. 
Right: depicted in full page in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, June, 1938. Also depicted in ‘Arts in the Third Reich’, Peter Adam, 1992.
Displayed at the GDK 1937 room 27 under the name ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied XI’.
 

Ad V. ‘Denn ihr, meine Jungen, ihr seid die lebenden Garanten Deutschlands, ihr seid das lebende Deutschland der Zukunft’. ‘You are the living Guarantors of Germany, you are the living Germany of the Future’, speech by Hitler in September 1933 to the Hitler Youth. Depicted in ‘Kunst und Volk’, 1937, in ‘Deutsches Lesebuch für Volksschulen’, 1943, and in ‘Das Bild des Herrschers in Malerei und Grafik des Nationalsozialismus’, Tobias Ronge, 2009. 
Displayed at the GDK 1937 room 27 under the name ‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied XII’.

Ad VI. ‘Wer seinem Volk so die Treue hielt, soll selbst in Treue nie vergessen sein’. ‘Who will be faithfull to the people, will be remembered for ever’.


Series: ‘Deutsches Lied’ (German Song’), 1938
In 1938, Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde created ‘Deutsches Lied’, a series of 6 lino prints. All of them were displayed at the GDK 1939 in room 29.

I. ‘Abend wird es wieder, ‘über Wald und Feld, säuselt Frieden nieder, und es ruht die Welt‘. ‘It’s evening again, ‘peace descends over forest and fields, and the world rests’, quote by August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben (1798 – 1874). 

II. ‘In einem kühlen Grunde, da geht ein Mühlenrad, mein Liebchen ist verschwunden, das dort gewohnet hat‘. ‘Within a watered valley, a mill turns night and day, and there my love was dwelling, before she went away’, Joseph von Eichendorff (1788 – 1857).

III. ‘Nun ade, du mein lieb’ Heimatland, lieb’ Heimatland, ade! Es geht jetzt fort zum fernen Strand, Lieb’ Heimatland, ade!‘ ‘Farewell to you now, my homeland, dear homeland, farewell! Now I am off to a foreign shore, dear homeland, farewell!’, quote by August Disselhoff (1829 – 1903).

IV. ‘Ordensburg Vogelsang’: ‘Geht in den Fussstapfen, who schon eurer Väter Tugend ging! Wie wollt ihr hochsteigen, wenn nicht eurer Väter Wille mit euch steigt?’ ‘Follow the footsteps of your father’s virtue! How will you go up, if the will of your fathers does not go up with you?’, phrase from ‘Also sprach Zarathustra’, by Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 – 1900).

V. ‘Was frag ich viel nach Geld und Gut, Wenn ich zufrieden bin! Gibt Gott mir nur gesundes Blut, So hab ich frohen Sinn und sing mit dankbarem Gemüt mein Morgen- und mein Abendlied‘. ‘What do I care for money and possession, when I’m content! When God gives me good health then I’m in high spirits, and sing with thankful heart my morning- and my evening-song’, Johannes Martin Miller, 1776. 

VI. ‘Wenn ich den Wandrer frage, wo kommst du her? Von Hause, von Hause, spricht er, und seufzet schwer‘. ‘When I ask the Wanderer, where do you come from? From home, from home, he sighs’, quote by Franz Hermann von Hermannsthal (1799 – 1875). 

Ad I. ‘Abend wird es wieder, ‘über Wald und Feld, säuselt Frieden nieder, und es ruht die Welt‘. ‘It’s evening again, ‘peace descends over forest and fields, and the world rests’, quote by August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben (1798 – 1874). Displayed at the GDK 1939 room 29, bought by the Reichskanzlei. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Ad II. ‘In einem kühlen Grunde, da geht ein Mühlenrad, mein Liebchen ist verschwunden, das dort gewohnet hat‘. ‘Within a watered valley, a mill turns night and day, and there my love was dwelling, before she went away’, Joseph von Eichendorff (1788 – 1857). Depicted in full page in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten Reich’, 1939. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978. Displayed at the GDK 1939 room 29; depicted in the exhibition catalog. Bought by the Reichskanzlei.

Ad III. ‘Nun ade, du mein lieb’ Heimatland, lieb’ Heimatland, ade! Es geht jetzt fort zum fernen Strand, Lieb’ Heimatland, ade!‘ ‘Farewell to you now, my homeland, dear homeland, farewell! Now I am off to a foreign shore, dear homeland, farewell!’, quote by August Disselhoff (1829 – 1903). Displayed at the GDK 1939 room 29, bought by the Reichskanzlei.

Ad IV. ‘Ordensburg Vogelsang’: ‘Geht in den Fussstapfen, who schon eurer Väter Tugend ging! Wie wollt ihr hochsteigen, wenn nicht eurer Väter Wille mit euch steigt?’ ‘Follow the footsteps of your father’s virtue! How will you go up, if the will of your fathers does not go up with you?’, phrase from ‘Also sprach Zarathustra’, by Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 – 1900). Displayed at the GDK 1939 room 29. Depicted in ‘Das Bild des Herrschers in Malerei und Grafik des Nationalsozialismus’, Tobias Ronge, 2009.

Ad V. ‘Was frag ich viel nach Geld und Gut, Wenn ich zufrieden bin! Gibt Gott mir nur gesundes Blut, So hab ich frohen Sinn und sing mit dankbarem Gemüt mein Morgen- und mein Abendlied‘. ‘What do I care for money and possession, when I’m content! When God gives me good health then I’m in high spirits, and sing with thankful heart my morning- and my evening-song’, Johannes Martin Miller, 1776. Woodcut print. Displayed at the GDK 1939 room 29. Bought by the Reichskanzlei. Depicted in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, 1939. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Ad VI. ‘Wenn ich den Wandrer frage, wo kommst du her? Von Hause, von Hause, spricht er, und seufzet schwer‘. ‘When I ask the Wanderer, where do you come from? From home, from home, he sighs’, quote by Franz Hermann von Hermannsthal (1799 – 1875). 
Displayed at the GDK 1939 room 29. Bought by the Reichskanzlei. Also displayed at the ‘Frühjahrs Ausstellung Düsseldorf‘, 1940, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf; depicted in the exhibition catalog. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.


‘Colui che può guardare in faccia la Morte’
Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Colui che può guardare in faccia la Morte’ (‘Der dem Tod ins Angesicht schauen kann, der Soldat allein ist der freie Mann’). ‘He who can look death in the face, that soldier alone is the free man’. Quote from the ‘Wallenstein Trilogy’ by Friedrich Schiller (1759 -1805). Lino print. Displayed at the ‘Esposizione d’Arte Contemporanea di Düsseldorf’, Florance, 1943, under the name ‘Colui che può guardare in faccia la Morte’.
Also displayed at the GDK 1942 room 28. Bought by Theo Memmel (mayor of the city of Würzburg), the Reichs-Rundfunk GmbH in Berlin, and the Landesgewerbeanstalt Westmark in Kaiserslautern. Size 59,4 x 46 cm.
Below: depicted in ‘Das Bild, 1942.

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Der Gott, der Eisen wachsen ließ, der wollte keine Knechte!‘ ‘The God who grew iron, did not want servants!, Ernst Moritz Arndt (1769 – 1860).
Right: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Im Felde, da ist der Mann noch was wert, Da wird das Herz noch gewogen. Da tritt kein anderer für ihn ein, Auf sich selber steht er da ganz allein‘. ’In the field, the man is still worth something, since the heart still weighs. There is no one else standing up for him, he is all alone on his own’. Reiterlied by Friedrich Schiller (1759 – 1805). 
Displayed at the GDK 1942 room 28 under the name ‘Der Reiter’ (‘The Rider’), bought by Theo Memmel (mayor of the city of Würzburg) and by the Landesgewerbeanstalt Westmark in Kaiserslautern. Size 59,4 x 46 cm.
   

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Ein Pfui dem Mann, Der sich nicht wehren kann. Not lehrt das Gebot: Schlah dot, schlah dot‘. ‘Shame on the man who can’t defend himself. Necessity teaches the commandment: Kill, kill’, quote by Hermann Löns, fallen in 1914. Created in 1939.
Displayed under the name ‘Der Landsknecht’ at the GDK 1940 room 30. Bought by the NSDAP Arbeitsbereich Generalgouvernement Krakau. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Wo der deutsche Soldat steht, kommt kein anderer hin‘. ’Where the German soldier stands, no one else can go’, quote by Adolf Hitler, d.d. 10 December 1940.
Right: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Frei ist nur das Volk das stark genug ist seine Freiheit zu behaupten’. ’Free is only the nation that is strong enough to defend its freedom’, quote by Helmut von Moltke (1800 – 1891).
   

‘La Morte per la Patria è onore eterno’
Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘La Morte per la Patria è onore eterno’ (‘Der Tod für‘s Vaterland ist ewiger Verehrung wehrt‘. ‘Death for the Fatherland is worthy of everlasting honor’, wrote Ewald Christian von Kleist in 1759 in ‘Ode to the Prussian Army’, before dying such a death himself. Woodcut print.
Displayed under the name ‘Deutsche Eiche’ at the GDK 1940 room 30. Bought by the NSDAP Arbeitsbereich Generalgouvernement Krakau. Als displayed at the ‘Esposizione d’Arte Contemporanea di Düsseldorf’, Florence, 1943, under the name ‘La Morte per la Patria è onore eterno’. Also displayed at the ‘Rheinische Kunstausstellung Wien’, 1941 (depicted in the exhibition catalog), and at the ‘Rheinische Kunstausstellung Danzig’, 1941. 
Right: depicted in ‘Der deutsche Kamerad. Soldatenzeitung der Deutschen Heeresmission in Rumänien‘, 15 March, 1942. Also depicted full-page in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1940.
   

‘Contadino della brughiera’ 
Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Contadino della brughiera’ (‘Heidebauer‘). ‘Heath Farmer‘. Woodcut print. Displayed at the ‘Esposizione d’Arte Contemporanea di Düsseldorf’, Florance, 1943, under the name ‘Contadino della brughiera’ (depicted in the exhibition catalog).
Right: also displayed at the ‘Kunstausstellung für Deutsche Soldaten‘, 1942, Städtische Kunsthalle, Düsseldorf (depicted in the exhibition catalog).
 

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Es gibt nut einene Adel – den Adel der Arbeit’. ‘There is only one aristocracy, the aristocracy of work’, quote by Adolf Hitler, 1933. Depicted on the cover of Frauenwarte, Heft 22, 1935.
Right: 
Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘In der Heide‘ (‘In the Heither‘). Displayed at the Grosse Kunstausstellung Düsseldorf, 1937; depicted in the exhibition catalog.
 

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Ruhrarbeiter’ (‘Worker from the Ruhr-area’), woodcut print, 1936. The text below reads: ‘In das ew´ge Dunkel nieder steigt der Knappe, der Gebieter einer unterird´schen Welt‘. ’Down into the eternal darkness rises the miner, the master of the underground world’, Theodor Körner (1791 – 1813). Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.
Right: ‘Berg Leute’ (‘Mineworkers’). Depicted in ‘Deutsche Zeitung im Ostland’, 21 February 1943.
 

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Maurer’ (‘Bricklayer’), 1939. The text below reads: ‘Was wir selbst tun können, das dürfen wir Gott nicht überlassen‘. ‘What we can do for ourselves we must not leave to God’, quote by Gorch Fock (1880 -1916). Displayed at the GDK 1940 room 30. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.
Right: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Mit jedem Spatenstich, den ihr tut, baut ihr an dem habentisch unserer kinder und enkelkinder’. ’With every groundbreaking that you do, you are setting the table for our children and grandchildren’, Walter Flex (1887-1917). 
Displayed at the GDK 1940 room 30. Bought by the Erziehungsheim Fassoldshof in Kulmbach.
   

Woodcut number III from the series ‘Der Führer Spricht’, depicted in ‘Deutsche Zeitung im Ostland’, d.d 2 April 1944.

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Wer leben will, der Kämpfe also, und wer nicht streiten will in dieser Welt des ewigen Ringens, verdient das Leben nicht‘. ‘Who wants to live has to fight, and who does not want to fight in this world of eternal battle is not worthy of life’, quote by Adolf Hitler, – Mein Kampf. Depicted in ‘Ewiges Deutschland, -ein deutsches Hausbuch‘, 1939.
Right: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Der Furcht so fern, dem Tod so nah. Heil dir SA!’ (‘So far from Fear, to Death so Near. Hail to thee, SA!’). Quote from a speech by Goebbels, likely in 1933.   

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, ‘Heidebauer‘ (‘Heath Farmer‘), GDK 1944 room 28.
Right: ‘Heidebauer’ depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.
   

Left: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, 1950.
Right: Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, selfportrait, August 1945.
   

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, 1957. Depicted in ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’, 1978.

Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde
Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, born in 1903 in Essen, was the ninth son of an artiIIery officer and construction engineer. His father’s family came from the Netherlands. After the early death of his father in 1908, Sluyterman was brought up in a working-class district in Essen, in poor circumstances. In 1920 he went to the Essen Arts-and-Crafts School where he attended the courses of Wilhelm Poetter (graphic art and decorative painting) and Hermann Kätelhön (wood-engraving). He completed his training at the Düsseldorf Academy where, as a pupil of Fritz Mackensen and Spatz, then the Meisterschüler of Julius Paul Junghanns, he finally settled as a graphic artist in Düsseldorf. He joined the NSDAP on 1 May 1928, which immediately resulted in him losing several commissions.
Sluyterman was also a member of the S.A., just as his brother Wolf. His speciality was the designing of party posters and caricatures and he drew the heading of the weekly newspaper of the Gau Düsseldorf, ‘Die Neue Front’, being a regular contributor to it. He became known for his engravings on wood and lino, which deal with rustic Iife in Lower Saxony and the landscapes of the Lüneburg Heath. Working in the style of the old masters, i.a. Albrecht Dürer, his works praise the world of work and solders -in a romantic style- and were more often than not, illustrated with quotes from historical German poets, philosophers, Hitler, or folk songs. In 1934 he traveled through the Lüneburg Heath. At the end of the 1930s, he also started to paint.
In 1935, the Folkwang Museum in Essen bought severaI of his works.
He then made four major series of engravings: ‘Des Deutschen Volkes Lied 1935’ (‘Song of the German People’), ‘Es mahnen die Väter 1936’ (The Fathers are Warning’), ‘Der Führer Spricht 1937’ (‘The Leader Speaks’), and ‘Deutsches Lied’ (German Song’), 1938. These woodcut and linocut series made him very popular and were often reproduced in newspapers, magazines and books , -like ‘Ewiges Deutschland’. He also designed severaI murals for hostels of the Hitler Youth and of the SA.
Sluyterman took part in the following exhibitions: 
– the ‘Frühjahrs Ausstellung Düsseldorf’, 1940 (three lino prints;
– the ‘Rheinische Kunstausstellung Wien’, 1941 (two woodcut prints);
– the ‘Rheinische Kunstausstellung Danzig’, 1941 (two woodcut prints);
– the ‘Kunstausstellung für Deutsche Soldaten’, 1942, Städtische Kunsthalle, Düsseldorf;
– the ‘Frühjahrs Ausstellung, Peussisiche Akademie der Künste’, 1942 (two wouldcut prints, three lino prints);
– the ‘Frühjahrs Ausstellung, Peussisiche Akademie der Künste’, 1940 (two woodcut prints).
He was also represented at the ‘Esposizione d’Arte Contemporanea di Düsseldorf’, Florance, 1943, with: ‘Minatore’ (‘Mineworker), ‘Contadino della Brughiera’ (‘Heath Farmer’), ‘Colui che può guardare in faccia la Morte’ (‘He who can look death in the face, that soldier alone is the free man’, -quote from Friedrich Schiller 1759 -1805), and with ‘La Morte per la Patria è onore eterno’ (‘Death for the Fatherland is worthy of everlasting honor’, -quote from Ewald Christian von Kleist in 1759). 
Sluyterman showed eight works at the ‘XXII Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte 1940’: ‘Ci esortano i padri’ (the series ‘Es mahnen die Väter 1936’, nrs. 1,2,4,5,7,8), ‘La canzone del popolotedesco’ (‘Des deutschen Volkes Lied 1935’) and ‘Parla il Führer’ (‘Der Führer Spricht’).
In 1940 he settled at Bendestorf, near Hamburg, and created his first large format paintings. A year later he volunteered for service on the Eastern Front.
At the Great German Art Exhibitions he displayed an impressive number of 37 works, including five oil paintings. At the GDK 1937, al 10 works of his series ‘Des Deutschen Volkes Lied 1935’ and 2 works of ‘Der Führer Spricht 1936’ were displayed. At the GDK 1938 at least 5 works of his series ‘Es mahnen die Väter’ were displayed and at the GDK 1939 all 6 works of his series ‘Deutsches Lied 1938’ were shown. 
Adolf Hitler bought for 8,000 Reichsmark ‘In der Lüneburger Heide’ (‘In the Lüneburg Heath‘, oil, GDK 1943). The Reichskanzlei bought seven works and Theo Memmel, the mayor of Würzburg, five. Joseph Goebbels bought the paintings ‘Rast in der Heide’ (‘Rest in the Heather’, GDK 1943, price 10.000 Reichsmarks) and ‘Auf einsamer Heide’ (‘On lonely Heath’, GDK 1944, price 14,000 Reichsmark). Other byers at the GDK were: Karl Brandt (German physican and SS officer), the Erziehungsheim Fassoldshof, the Landesgewerbeanstalt Westmark, the NSDAP Arbeitsbereich Generalgouvernement, and the Reichs-Rundfunk GmbH.
Captured by the British towards the end of the war, he was interned for more than a year. In the ‘de-nazification’ period, some of his works were destroyed and he attempted to continue his career in very difficult circumstances. To earn a Iiving he did mainly publicity and commerciaI drawings. He picked up painting again in the fifties, also writing poems, ballads, and songs in the spirit of the songs of Hermann Löns, which he sang while accompanying himself on the guitar (bringing out a record in 1970). In 1970 he received the ‘Ring of Honour’ in gold of the ‘Deutsches Kulturwerk Europaischen Geistes’. His engravings were published again and distributed mainly from 1975 on by the Uwe Berg publishing house.
Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde died in 1978 in Bendestorf. The Landkreis of Harburg posthumously awarded him its Culture Prize and he was also made a honorary citizen of Bendestor. 
In 1978 his older brother Wolf, published the book ‘Georg Sluyterman von Langeweyde, -Werden, Werk und Wesen eines deutschen Künstlers’.
The Museum Kulturspeicher owns five works by Sluyterman von Weydeman, including two works bought by Theo Memmel at the GDK 1942. The US Army Military Center of History owns five works by Sluyterman von Langeweyde, including ‘Die Familie’, ‘SA Men’, ‘The Worker’ and ‘Grenade Thrower’. The German Historical Museum is in the possession of ‘Auf einsame Heide’, bought by Joseph Goebbels at the GDK 1944. 
‘In der Lüneburger Heide‘ (GDK 1943) was found back in 1945 in the Czech Republic, -Monastery of Hohenfurt (depicted in the ‘Hitlerova Sbirka v Cechach’, by Jiri Kuchar, 2012). Nowadays it hangs in the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.

Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
In the beginning of 1944, Dr. Hans Reger (architect in charge of the Führerbau, Munich 1938-1945) shipped in several transports 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection -and other stolen art collections- to the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.
After the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Art works then considered as having no value, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind. They were photographed in August 1945 by the former director of the Czech State Institute of Photometry, Antonín Friedl, along with the photographer Jan Tuháček. ‘In der Lüneburger Heide‘  by Sluyterman von Langweyde was one of the paintings
at the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Later, the art works previously owned by Hitler, ended up scattered across the country.
Since 2012, twenty-three paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found at various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered at the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. One painting was found at the Military Institute in Prague, and four works were found at the Sychrov Castle. Four other paintings were found in the building of the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.

Three larges bronzes were found at the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery: ‘The Rower’ by Hermann Zettlitzer, ‘Aphrodite‘ by Wilhelm Wandschneider, and ‘The Sower‘ by Willi Knapp.
All the twenty-three paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.

‘In der Lüneburger Heide‘ by Sluyterman von Langweyde still hangs in the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.