Heinrich Faltermeier, Mädchen im Wind

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Description

‘Mädchen im Wind’ (‘Girl in the Wind’)
Bronze, model from 1937, cast in 1939.
Height 178 cm. 

‘Mädchen im Wind’ by Faltermeier, displayed at the exhibition ‘Art in the Third Reich, Seduction and Distraction’, Museum Arnhem, The Netherlands, November 2023 – March 2024. Photo’s Eva Broekema. 

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Mädchen im Wind‘. Executed in plaster. GDK 1942 room 21.

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Mädchen im Wind‘. Executed in marble. GDK 1943 room 24. This statue was sold for 17,000 Reichsmark to the city of Eberswalde. It was placed in 1943 a public park, but disappeared at the end of the war.

‘Muchacha al Viento’
The 1943-GDK sculpture ‘Mädchen im Wind’, standing in a public park in Eberswalde (‘Parque Municipal de Eberswalde’) was depicted in the Spanish exhibition catalog ‘Exposicion de Esculpturas Heinrich Faltermeier’, Grifé & Escoda S.L., d.d. 1948, Barcelona. The exhibition catalog mentions 39 works by Faltermeier, including a second marble cast of ‘Mädchen im Wind’, listed as ‘Muchacha al Viento’. 

‘Mädchen in Wind’, the marble GDK-1943 cast, depicted on a postcard issued by Heinrich Hoffmann.  
   

– condition : II
– size : height 178 cm
– signed : at foot ‘Modelliert 1937 – Faltermeier – 1939 1 Guss’
– type : bronze
   

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BIOGRAPHY: HEINRICH FALTERMEIER

Left: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Jüngling’ (‘Young Man‘), bronze. Displayed at the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung‘, 1942. Depicted in the exhibition catalog.
Right: ‘Jüngling’ by Faltermeier, displayed at the GDK 1938 room 15. Executed in plaster. Bought by Hitler for 4.000 Reichsmark.
Below, right: ‘Jüngling’ by Faltermeier, depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1941. 
   

Discovery of 4 Third Reich-sculptures in Berlin, November 2016
In November 2016, German Art Gallery discovered 4 life size Third Reich-sculptures in the garden of the headquarters of the Ministery Finance, Wilhelmstrasse 97, Berlin. The bronzes were incorrectly described and/or described as ‘work by unidentified artist’ in the files of the German Bundesfinanzministerium.
On initiative of German Art Gallery, Bild Newspaper published at 2 November 2016 the discovery of the sculptures, -by Joseph Wackerle, Richard Scheibe, Hermann Joachim Pagels and Heinrich Faltermeier.  ‘Jüngling, Erde’ by Joseph Wackerle, comes from the Old Chancellery. The other three sculptures could come from the New Chancellery, but there is no hard evidence for that. They were bought by Hitler at the GDK-1938, but they are not on the so-called ‘144-List’ of the 1938-New Chancellery purchases (a not exhaustive list).
Shortly afterwards, on November 5, 2016, also the newspaper Times wrote a newsarticle about it. For more details, please see our  Newsletter, November 2016

‘Jüngling’ by Faltermeier, 2 November 2016. Bronze, life size. Found back by German Art Gallery in the garden of the headquarters of the Ministery Finance, Wilhelmstrasse 97, Berlin. Published by Bild newspaper on 2 November 2016.
   

The Times, November 5, 2016
Hitler’s statues have been in finance ministery garden for decades
By Allan Hall, Berlin

The German finance authorities have been left red-faced after it emerged that four statues that have stood in the gardens of the finance ministry for decades belonged to Adolf Hitler. The statues were bought between 1937 and 1938 at the Great German Art exhibitions in Munich that showcased the kind of ‘superman’ images that the figures embody. One of the statues, Jüngling, Erde by Josef Wackerle, was one of two bronzes that graced the enormous dining room built for the Führer at the Reichschancellery designed by Albert Speer. Hitler moved into his new quarters in May 1934. American bombers destroyed the Old Chancellery, including the dining room, on February 3, 1945. Bild, the German tabloid newspaper, hired a historian to research the provenance of the life-sized statues which stand in the gardens of the ministry in the heart of Berlin. The building itself carries the weight of history: it was formerly the Luftwaffe ministry of Hermann Goering, from which the Battle of Britain was directed in 1940. After the war the enormous ministry, which survived the Allied air assault that destroyed about 85 per cent of the centre of Berlin, was taken over by Soviet forces and it was in one of its rooms that the German Democratic Republic was brought into being. The statues -which also include The Thinker by Richard Scheiber, Schwimmerby Hermann Joachim Pagels and Jüngling by Heinrich Faltermeier– were, according to a spokesman for the finance ministry, already in the courtyard when its bureaucrats moved into the building there in 1999 after reunification. A ministry spokesman added: ‘We are following new clues as to the origin of the statues and will deal with the findings responsibly.’ It remains a mystery how they came to be there and showcasing Nazi art in a public place is a headache for the German government. The ministry is considering what to do with the statues.
‘Hitler acquisitions on show in a public building without comment -this is somewhat difficult in Germany,’ said Christian Fuhrmeister of the Central Institute for Art History, who researched the statues for Bild. ‘It would be nice if visitors to the ministry were informed in the future about the origin of the sculptures.’

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Jüngling‘, located in the ‘Moltke-Anlagen‘ (‘Moltke Park-area‘), Eberswalde. Before 1945. The sculpture disappeared at the end of the war. It is unclear if this is the same bronze as found back in the garden of the headquarters of the Ministery Finance in Berlin (above).
   

Two bronzes by Faltermeier, ‘Jüngling’ and ‘Ein Traum’. The photo is dated December 1949 (Kreisarchiv Barnim, Eberswalde). Another document dated 20 December 1944 lists these works as ‘in the possession of the city of Eberswalde’. 

Left and middle: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Ein Traum’ (‘A Dream‘). GDK 1939 room 22. Executed in plaster.
Right: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Ein Traum’, described and depicted in the ‘Salzburger Volksblatt’, July 17, 1939.
    

Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
In the beginning of 1944, Dr. Hans Reger (architect in charge of the Führerbau, Munich 1938-1945) shipped in several transports 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection -and other stolen art collections- to the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.
After the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Art works then considered as having no value, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind. They were photographed in August 1945 by the former director of the Czech State Institute of Photometry, Antonín Friedl, along with the photographer Jan Tuháček. ‘Jüngling’ by Heinrich Faltermeier (the version described below) was
amongst the sculptures at the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Later, the art works previously owned by Hitler, ended up scattered across the country.
Since 2012, twenty-three paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found back at various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered at the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. One painting was found at the Military Institute in Prague, and four works were found at the Sychrov Castle. Four other paintings were found in the building of the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.
Three larges bronzes were found back at the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery: ‘The Rower’ by Hermann Zettlitzer, ‘Aphrodite‘ by Wilhelm Wandschneider, and ‘The Sower‘ by Willi Knapp.
All the twenty-three paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.

‘Jüngling’ (‘Young Man’) by Faltermeier, GDK 1940, room 2. Bought by Hitler for 18,000 RM. Photos taken in 1945 in the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Depicted in the ‘Hitlerova Sbirka v Cechach’, by Jiri Kuchar, 2012.
 

Left: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Jüngling‘ (‘Young Man‘), plaster. Displayed at the GDK 1940 room 2.
Right: preliminary viewing of the GDK, July 10, 1940. At the background ‘Jüngling’ by Faltermeier.
From-left-to right: Heinrich Hoffman, Karl Kolb (director Haus der Deutsche Kunst), art historian Ottmar Endres, Adolf Hitler, Gerdy Troost, Gauleiter Adolf Wagner, theologian/priest Martin Adolf Bormann, Reichsleiter Martin Bormann, Adjutant Max Wünsche, Obersturmführer Hans Georg Schulze, Admiral Karl Jesko von Puttkamer and Adjutant Wilhelm Brückner.
   

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Der grosse Künder’ (‘The Great Prophet‘), plaster. GDK 1944 room 2. Sold for 25.000 Reichsmark.
Left: ‘Der grosse Künder’ by Faltermeier, depicted in ‘Die Kunst im deutschen Reich‘, 1944.
Right: ‘Der grosse Künder’, depicted in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, September-Oktober 1944. 

Left: ‘Der grosse Künder’, in the atelier of the artist.
Right: ‘Der grosse Künder’, unknown location.
   

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Sigrid‘. Displayed at the ‘Münchener Kunstaustellung‘, Maximilianeum, 1941; depicted in the exhibition catalog.

Heinrich Faltermeier, the accompanying text reads: ‘Auf der Ausstellung‘ (’At the Exhibition’). Photo in possession of the Zentral Institut für Kunstgeschichte, München. Date and exhibition unknown; possibly the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunst-Ausstellung’, Nationalgalerie, 1942. Faltermeier was called up for military services likely in November 1941.

Left: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Fräulein Annemarie Jakob‘. GDK 1943 room 29; depicted in the exhibition catalog. Also printed on postcards issued by the Haus der Deutschen Kunst. Bought by Goebbels for 3.000 Reichsmark. The bust is lost.
Right: ‘Fräulein Annemarie Jakob‘, depicted in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, January, 1943. 
 

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Naked Young Woman‘, bronze. With foundry mark Codina. Height 76 cm. Sold by a Spanish auction house in 2009.

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Grosse Venus’ (‘Venus’). Bronze, life size. Date of creation 1948, Barcelona.

Left: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Akt‘ (‘Nude‘). Created in 1948, bronze. Height 80 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2006.
Right: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Stehende Damenakt’ (‘Standing Nude‘). Signed 1982. Bronze, height 82 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2015.
   

Heinrich Faltermeier, marble bust of a woman. Height 53 cm. Sold by a Spanish auction house in 2010.

Heinrich Faltermeier, ’Busto Feminino’ (‘Bust of a Woman’), 1960. Marble. Height 39 cm. Sold by a Spanish auction house in 2014.

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Busto de Concepción Perez Masegosa’ (‘Bust of Concepcion Perez Masegosa’, 1913 – 1994, widow of the architect Luis Moya Blanco). Bronze, signed 1944. Height 47 cm. In the possession of the Museum of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando, Madrid.

Left: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Kriegerehrenmal für Bad Neuenahr‘ (‘World War I Memorial for the village of Neuenahr‘). Created in 1939. Replaced in 1955 by a six meter high wooden cross, commemorating the Fallen of both world wars.
Left: ‘Kriegerehrenmal für Bad Neuenahr‘. Photo: Zentral Institut für Kunstgeschichte.
Right: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Soldatenbüste’ (‘Bust of a Soldier’). Date of creation unknown. Photo: Zentral Institut für Kunstgeschichte.  
 

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Büste Reichsminister R. Hess’ (‘Bust of Reichsminister Rudoph Hess’), GDK 1938 room 21. Bought by Hitler for 800 Reichsmark.

Heinrich Faltermeier, Pericles-statue at the facade of the Glyptothek in Munich. Created in the 1960s.
The Glyptothek, a museum in Munich, was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures. It was designed by Leo von Klenze in the neoclassical style, and built from 1816 to 1830.
Left: ‘Pericles’ by Faltermeier. Photo 2024.
Right: ‘Pericles’, left part, in the middle.
  

Left and middle: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Statue of Pericles’, located in the city of Athens. Carved out of a single block of 10.000 kilogram Carara marble.
Right: New York Times of February 12, 1973: the unofficial revealing of the statue by the major of the city of Athens caused a scandal (text below).
       

PERICLES STATUE STIRS UP AHEM,
New York Times, February 12, 1973.

ATHENS, Feb. 11—A major artistic dispute has been set off in Athens with the unofficial unveiling by Mayor Demetrios Ritsos of a statue honoring Pericles, the Athenian statesman, some 2,400 years after his death. The mayor brushed aside objections from an official panel of experts and had the statue erected before a new city cultural center, downtown.
The statue is the work of a German sculptor, Heinrich Faltermeier. The six‐foot work, carved in white Carrara marble, shows the helmeted statesman, who gave Athens its ‘golden age’ and the Parthenon, stepping forward to deliver his famed ‘Funeral Oration,’ a hymn to democracy and patriotism. Objections to the statue ranged from criticism of the length of the knee‐long tunic, to questions whether Pericles should be shown wearing a helmet to deliver his speech. There were complaints, too concerning the proportions of the statue. ‘I was fed up with the arguments,’ the Mayor said today. ‘So instead of waiting for the official unveiling due Monday, I went there last Saturday alone and pulled off the sheet. Let the public be the judge.’ Last Monday officials and notables were warned the official unveiling had been postponed for ‘technical reasons.’ The statue of Pericles is a gift to the city from Ioannis Theodorakopoulos, a shipowner who said that it had cost him USD 50,000. ‘The result of this whole mess,’ he told an interviewer, ‘is that anyone who feels like making a gift to the Greeks will soon regret it because he is bound to get in trouble.’ Michael Tombros, chairman of the official panel, who is a sculptor and a professor at the School of Fine Arts, said that the statue was ‘inadequate’ for Athens. ‘It incorporates many dissimilar elements and lacks in historical accuracy and perspective,’ he said. Two other leading sculptors who were on the official panel set up by the Government objected to the statue’s alleged ‘lack of proportion.’ ‘All nonsense,’ said the Mayor. ‘They are resenting the fact that the statue of Pericles had to be bought from a foreign artist. Yet, when we invited them to a nationwide competition last September, not one participated. So we looked round and found Faltermeier’s.’ The statue has been attracting large crowds of Athenians since newspapers reported the controversy. Experts said that although there were ancient busts showing Pericles wearing a helmet, there were no literary or pictorial descriptions of his physique. The statue has the same helmeted head associated with the busts, but the body is that of a stout, short, muscular man with powerful legs and big feet. The panel contended the head was too big for the body. The Roman‐style tunic reaches just above the knees. The critics say there should be long robes instead. The right hand of the statue is depicted holding the manuscript of the oration. The left hand rests on the waist. The statue is propped against a stylized tree trunk. Mr. Faltermeier, who is 63 years old, is very embittered by the Greek criticism. He said his Pericles was the culmination of his 40‐year career and had taken him 10 years. Yesterday the Mayor presented to him the medal of Athens ‘for demonstrating your love for this city by deeds.’ The Mayor said he planned to give Greek sculptors another chance to show their worth by proclaiming a new competition for a statue of Pericles. ‘If the Greek Pericles is better than the German one, I shall replace him,’ he declared.

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Mädchen mit Ganz’ (‘Girl with Goose’), date of creation and location unknown.

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Bust of Michael Wolgemut‘. Located in the Rhumeshalle, Munich. Replacement, created by Faltermeier in 1968.
The bust of German painter Michael Wolgemut (1434 – 1519), was originally in 1815 created in carara marble by Konrad Eberhard. It was destinated by King Ludwig I of Bavaria for the Walhalla. Later it was placed in the Rhumeshalle. In 1944, the bust was destroyed by Allied bombs.
The Ruhmeshalle (Hall of Fame), designed by Leo von Klenze for Ludwig I of Bavaria, is situated on the Theresienwiese in Munich. With the construction and exhibition of busts of important people from Bavaria, including the Palatinate, Franconia and Swabia, King Ludwig I intended to create a hall of fame that honors laudable and distinguished people of his kingdom, as he did also in the Walhalla memorial for all of Germany.   

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Innere Harmonie‘ (‘Inner Harmony‘). Created 1982/83. Located in front of the Kurhaus of Bad Wörishofen.
   

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Standing Nude’, created in 1948 in Barcelona. Height 180 cm.
   

Left: Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Woge. Rückenansicht‘ (‘Wave. Backsite‘). Signed 1990. From the 1975-cyles ‘Das Meer und das Mädchen‘ (‘The Sea and the Girl‘). Size 100 x 52 x 20 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2008.
Right: front side of the relief ‘Woge’.
 

Heinrich Faltermeier, ‘Female Torso in Side View‘, 1986. Bronze. Size 58 x 37cm.  Sold by a German auction house in 2019.

‘Heinrich Faltermeier Exhibition’, 1976, branche of Deutsche Bank in the city of Siegen.

Heinrich Faltermeier, date unknown.

Heinrich Faltermeier
Heinrich Faltermeier (1909 – 1999), born in Munich, took an apprenticeship as goldsmith from 1923 to 1927. He worked in Munich from 1927 to 1932 as a professional goldsmith, then went to Spain in 1933. After the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Faltermeier returned to Munich and went from 1936 to 1943 to the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. Here he studied Art-history under professor Ernst Buschor and professor Hans Jantzen, Anatomy under professor Siegfried Mollier, and, as Meisterschühler, under professor Joseph Wackerle.
Faltermeier, who worked in marble, bronze and wood, was awarded the ‘Rom-Stipendium’ by the Ministery of Culture of Bavaria in 1938.
At the exhibition ‘Münchener Kunstausstellung 1941’ in the Maximilianeum, he displayed the marble bust ‘Sigrid‘ (depicted in the exhibition catalog). A year later he displayed at the ‘Münchener Kunstausstellung’ the relief ‘Meine Schwester’ (‘My Sister’). He participated in the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunst-Ausstellung’, Nationalgalerie, 1942, with the life-size bronze ‘Jüngling’ (‘Young Man’).
At the Great German Art Exhibitions, Faltermeier was represented with 14 works, which were sold for prices of up to 25,000 Reichsmarks. Hitler bought ‘Jüngling’ (‘Young Man’, GDK 1938 room 15) for 4,000 Reichsmark, a bust of Hess (GDK 1938 room 21) for 800 Reichsmark, and in 1940 again a ‘Jüngling’ figur (GDK 1940 room 2) for 18,000 Reichsmark. The Luftgaukommando VII (Sitz München) bought in 1938 a second copy of ‘Jüngling’. Joseph Goebbels bought the marble bust of ‘Fräulein Annemarie Jakob’ (GDK 1943 room 29) for 3,.000 Reichsmark (the bust is lost). The marble ‘Mädchen im Wind’ (‘Girl in the Wind’, GDK 1943) was bought for 17,000 Reichsmark by the city of Eberswalde: it was placed in 1943 a public park in Eberswalde, but disappeared at the end of the war. In total the city of Eberswalde had at 20 December 1944 seven works by Faltermeier in possession: ‘Jüngling mit Speer’ (‘Youg Man with Javelin’, bronze, placed in the ‘Moltke-Anlagen‘, now lost), ‘Ein Traum’ (‘A Dream’, bronze, lost), ‘Brunnen der Westendschule’ (‘Fountain of the Westendschule’, bronze), ‘Brunnen Gänsebub Vierjahresplansiedlung’ (‘Fountain of Boy with Geeses, Vierjahresplansiedlung’, plaster), ‘Mädel im Wind’ (‘Girl in the Wind’, marble, lost), ‘Brunnen Fishbändiger’ (‘Fish-tamer’, marble) and ‘Grosse männliche Aktfgur’ (‘Large Male Nude’, plaster). 
Several GDK-works by Faltermeier were depicted on postcards. In 1945 Faltermeier went back to Spain where he lived in Barcelona, Madrid, San Sebastian and  Palma de Mallorca.

‘Muchacha al Viento’
The 1943-GDK sculpture ‘Mädchen im Wind’, standing in a public park in Eberswalde (‘Parque Municipal de Eberswalde’) was depicted in the Spanish exhibition catalog ‘Exposicion de Esculpturas Heinrich Faltermeier’, Grifé & Escoda S.L., d.d. 1948, Barcelona. The exhibition catalog mentioned 39 works by Faltermeier, including a second marble cast of ‘Mädchen im Wind’, listed as ‘Muchacha al Viento’. 

In December 1953 around 100 works by Faltermeier were displayed at the exhibition ‘Exposición de Heinrich Faltermeier’, Museo Nacional de Arte Contemporáneo, Madrid. In 1954 the Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich, staged the exhibition ‘Otto Dill / Heinrich Faltermeier / Werner von Houwald. 
Faltermeier returned to Munich in 1960; from 1966 tot 1999 he lived in Piesenkam, a village south of Munich. In 1976, the branche of Deutsche Bank in the city of Siegen, staged an exhibition on Heinrich Faltermeier. 

Works which Faltermeier created in Germany and Greece, after 1960, included:
– ‘Delphin-fountain‘ in Sulzbach Rosenberg, 1959;
– statue ‘Albrecht der Weise‘ for the Michaelskirche in München;
– the monumental ‘Hochaltarbild in Ravenna-Mosaik‘ for the St. Ulrich Church in Kaufbeuren;
– ‘Strömungslinien‘, Wasserwerke München;
– bridge-relief  ‘Schöpfungsgeschichte’, in Immenstadt;
– bridge-relief ‘Kloster Wessobrunn’, in Weilheim;
–  fountaingroup ‘Spielende Bären’ for the ‘Hinterbärenbadschule’ in Munich;
– three busts for the Ruhmeshalle in Munich: Wolgemut, Günther and Leibl;
– large glasfenster for the ‘Hauskapelle der Englischen Fräulein’ in Fürstenfeldbruck;
– statue of Perikles in marble, for the Glyptothek in Munich;
– statue of Pericles for the city of Athen, 1973 (Greece);
– monumental ceramic wall ‘Meereswellen im Abendrot‘ in Bergen-Enkheim;
– life size statue of the horse ‘Warwick-Rex’ in the city of Bad Wörishofen;
– Statue ‘Albrecht der Weise’ for the Michaelskirche in Munich;
– life size bronze ‘Innere Harmonie’ in front of the Kurhaus in Bad Wörishofen;
– portraits in marble and bronze of philosophers, musicians and actors.

In 1973, the unofficial revealing of the Pericles-statue by the major of the city of Athens caused a scandal, as a result of ongoing public discussions about the sculpture. On February 12, 1973, the New York Times published an article about it, including the controversy over the artist not being a Greek, and placed a photo of Pericles by Faltermeier in their newspaper (see above).
In July 1999 Heinrich Faltermeier died in the harness, in his atelier in Piesenkam, Bavaria.
In 2009 the GDK 1940-‘Jüngling’ by Faltermeier (a plaster model bought by Hitler) was depicted in ‘Hitlerova Sbirka v Cechach’, 2009, written by Jiri Kuchar. It showed the sculpture in 1945 in the Czech Republic.
‘Mädchen im Wind’ (bronze, 1939) by Faltermeier, was displayed at the exhibition ‘Art in the Third Reich, Seduction and Distraction’, Museum Arnhem, The Netherlands, November 2023 – March 2024.

Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
In the beginning of 1944, Dr. Hans Reger (architect in charge of the Führerbau, Munich 1938-1945) shipped in several transports 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection -and other stolen art collections- to the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.
After the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Art works then considered as having no value, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind. They were photographed in August 1945 by the former director of the Czech State Institute of Photometry, Antonín Friedl, along with the photographer Jan Tuháček. ‘Jüngling’ by Heinrich Faltermeier (the version described below) was
amongst the sculptures at the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Later, the art works previously owned by Hitler, ended up scattered across the country.
Since 2012, twenty-three paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found back at various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered at the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. One painting was found at the Military Institute in Prague, and four works were found at the Sychrov Castle. Four other paintings were found in the building of the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.

Three larges bronzes were found back at the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery: ‘The Rower’ by Hermann Zettlitzer, ‘Aphrodite‘ by Wilhelm Wandschneider, and ‘The Sower‘ by Willi Knapp.
All the twenty-three paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.

In 2016 German Art Gallery discovered the bronze GDK 1938 ‘Jüngling’ by Faltermeier in the garden of the Bundesfinanzministerium
In November 2016, German Art Gallery discovered 4 life size Third Reich-sculptures in the garden of the headquarters of the Ministery Finance, Wilhelmstrasse 97, Berlin. The bronzes were incorrectly described and/or described as ‘work by unidentified artist’ in the files of the German Bundesfinanzministerium. On initiative of German Art Gallery, Bild Newspaper published at 2 November 2016 the discovery of the sculptures, -by Joseph Wackerle, Richard Scheibe, Hermann Joachim Pagels and Heinrich Faltermeier. ‘Jüngling, Erde’ by Joseph Wackerle, comes from the Old Chancellery. The other three sculptures could come from the New Chancellery, but there is no hard evidence for that. They were definitely bought by Hitler at the GDK-1938, but they are not on the so-called ‘144-List’ of the 1938-New Chancellery purchases (a not exhaustive list).
Shortly afterwards, on November 5, 2016, also the newspaper Times wrote a newsarticle about it (see above). For more details, please see our  Newsletter, November 2016
Its is unclear if the cast by Faltermeier, although identical, is the same as the cast of ‘Jüngling mit Speer‘, which was located before 1945 in the ‘Moltke-Anlagen‘ in Eberswalde.