Johann Schult, Erwartung

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Price: on request

Description

‘Erwartung’ (‘Expectations’)
Displayed at the GDK 1943 room 20.
Monumental work, bought by Hitler for 12.000 Reichsmark.
Found in the summer of 1945 in the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.

At the end of WWII, several stolen art collections -and 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection- were hidden by the National Socialists in the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic. ‘Erwartung’ by Schult was one of them.

‘Return Address: Reichskanzlei Berlin’
At the back an original sticker from the Haus der Deutschen Kunst with the text: ‘Anschrift für die Rücksendung: Reichskanzlei Berlin‘ (‘Return Address: Reichskanzlei Berlin‘).
The ‘Katalog-Nr. 893’ corresponds with the number in the exhibition catalog.

‘Erwartung’ by Schult, displayed at the GDK 1943 room 20.

Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
In the beginning of 1944, Dr. Hans Reger (architect in charge of the Führerbau, Munich 1938-1945) shipped in several transports 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection -and other stolen art collections- to the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.
After the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Art works then considered as having no value, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind. They were photographed in August 1945 by the former director of the Czech State Institute of Photometry, Antonín Friedl, along with the photographer Jan Tuháček. ‘Erwartung’ by Schult was one of the paintings in the Monastery of Hohenfurt in 1945. Later, the art works previously owned by Hitler, ended up scattered across the country.
Since 2012, twenty-three paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found back at various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered at the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. One painting was found at the Military Institute in Prague, and four works were found at the Sychrov Castle. Four other paintings were found in the building of the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.
Three larges bronzes were found back at the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery: ‘The Rower’ by Hermann Zettlitzer, ‘Aphrodite‘ by Wilhelm Wandschneider, and ‘The Sower‘ by Willi Knapp.
All the twenty-three paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.

‘Erwartung’ by Schult’ photographed in the summer of 1945 in the Monastery of Hohenfurt by Dr. Antonin Friedel and Jan Tuhácek. Published in ‘Hitlerova Sbirka’, 2009, by Jiri Kuchar.

‘Erwartung’ by Johann Schult, depicted in ‘Die Kunst dem Volk’, 1943.

Johann Schult, ‘Erwartung’, depicted on a postcard.

‘Erwartung’ by Schult, depicted in ‘Die Malerei im deutschen Faschismus’, 1974.

The painting is described (‘Whereabouts unknown’) in ‘The Politics of Nazi Art: The portrayal of Woman in Nazi painting’, dissertation by Jennifer Anne Miller, 1996.

– condition : II
– size : 195 x 160 cm
– signed : right, below
– type : oil on canvas.

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BIOGRAPHY: JOHANN SCHULT

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Im Badeanzug’ (‘In swimmimg Costume’). Depicted in ‘Westermanns Monatshefte’, August 1940.
Right: a slightly different version of ‘Badeanzug’ was displayed at the GDK 1938 room 2, under the name ‘Bildnis’ (‘Portrait’).
  

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Nach dem Bade’ (‘After Bathing’). GDK 1940 room 20. Bought for 4.000 Reichsmark by Hitler. Size 140 x 95 cm. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum. Depicted in ‘Münchner Maler im 19./20. Jahrhundert’, 1994.
Displayed at the exhibition ‘Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne‘, Weimar, 1999.
Right: Johann Schult, ‘Offenbarung’ (‘Revelation’). GDK 1943 room 20.
  

Above: Johann Schult, ‘Die Ruhende’ (‘Resting’). GDK 1942 room 23. Bought by Hitler for 12.000 Reichsmark. Size 228 x 159 cm. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum.
Below: ‘Die Ruhende’ displayed at the exhibition ‘Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne‘, Weimar, 1999.

Johann Schult, ‘Frau Venus‘(‘Venus‘), depicted in the magazine ‘Jugend‘, 1921, Heft 16, page 374.

Johann Schult, ‘Im Lebensfrühling’ (‘Spring of Life’). GDK  1942 room 23. Bought by Hitler for 12.000 Reichsmark. Size 194 x 159 cm. In the possession of Deutsches Historisches Museum. Depicted on postcards and in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, 1942.
Displayed at the exhibition ‘Kunst im 3. Reich, Dokumente der Unterwerfung’; the exhibition, instigated by the Frankfurter Kunstverein, was held from 1974 to 1975 in Frankfurt, Hamburg, Stuttgart, Ludwigshafen and Wuppertal; depicted in the exhibition catalogue.
Again displayed at the exhibition ‘Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne‘, Weimar, 1999.

‘Im Lebensfrühling’  and ‘ ‘Nach dem Bade’ by Schult, displayed at the exhibition ‘Art in the Third Reich, Seduction and Distraction’, Museum Arnhem, The Netherlands, November 2023 – March 2024. Photo’s Eva Broekema.

‘Im Lebensfrühling’  and ‘ ‘Nach dem Bade’ by Schult, depicted in the exhibition catalog ‘Art in the Third Reich’ by Jelle Bouwhuis and Almar Seinen, 2023.

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Akt am Strande’ (‘nude at beach’). GDK 1942 room 4. Postcard.
Right: Johann Schult, ‘Akt unternm Lampenlicht’ (‘Nude in Lamplight’). Postcard. GDK 1939 room 22. Bought by Martin Bormann for 3.500 Reichsmark. Depicted in the magazine ‘Jugend’, 1939.
  

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Im Gedanken’ (‘Deliberation’). Postcard. GDK 1941 room 4. Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1942.
Right: Johann Schult, ‘Ruhender Akt’ (‘Resting Nude’). GDK 1939 room 22. Bought by Arthur Seyss-Inquart for 4.500 Reichsmark. Depicted in the magazine ‘Jugend’, 1939.
   

Johann Schult, ‘Jugendlicher Akt’ (‘Young Nude’). Displayed at the ‘Kunst-Ausstellung Hilfswerk für deutsche bildende Kunst in der NS-Volkswohlfahrt’, Berlin, 1941. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue.

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Unterm Laubdach’ (‘Under the Leaf Canopy’). GDK 1940 room 38. Bought by Von Ribbentrop for 3.000 Reichsmark. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1940, and in ‘Die neue deutsche Malerei’, 1941.
Right: Johann Schult, ‘Aktbild einer jungen Tänzerin’ (‘Portrait of a Nude Female-dancer’). GDK 1941 room 22. Bought by Martin Bormann for 10.000 Reichsmark. Depicted on postcards, also in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1942, and in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, 1941.
  

Johann Schult, ‘Balletteuse’ (‘Ballerina’). Displayed at the ‘Münchener Kunstausstellung’ in the Glaspalast 1927. Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1927.

Left: Johann Schult, title unknown, signed 1914. Depicted on the cover of the magazine ‘Jugend’, 1920, Heft 50, page 1217.
Right: Johann Schult, title and date unknown. Oil on board. Size 36 x 28 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2012.
   


The Turning Point: Why don’t you take a tin can as model?!

Johann Schult, ‘Die Wendung’ (‘The Turning Point’). Anti-Semitic and anti modern-art publication in ‘Die Brennessel’, October 1933. The text below the depiction reads:

‘So, you have a new engagement as model? And I?’
‘Well, why don’t you take a tin-can as model?’

A remarkable advice by Johann Schult, as this is exactly what Any Warhol did decades later, -with great succes. In the possession of the Deutsches Pressemuseum, Berlin.

Johann Schult, ‘Adolf Hitler‘s Mein Kampf in 1 Million Auflage‘ (‘1 million copies sold of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf‘). Die Brennessel, October 1933. The text below the depiction reads: ‘This dam will break every wave’. In the possession of the Deutsches Pressemuseum, Berlin.

Johann Schult, ‘Der Zug ins gelobte Land’ (‘The train to the Praised Land’). Anti-Semitic publication in ‘Die Brennessel’, November 1932. The text below the depiction reads: ‘If Isaak continues in the same way as before, then we will have the same anti-Semitism in Switzerland, even before they have done business over there’. 

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Nicht Auszurotten’ (‘Not to Exterminate‘). Anti modern art publication in ‘Die Brennessel’, November 1932. The text below the depiction reads: ‘The Decree against national kitsch does not affect us, as we are international’. Brennessel April 1933. In the possession of the Deutsches Pressemuseum, Berlin.
Right: Johann Schult, ‘Jedem das Seine’ (‘Each to his Own’). Publication in ‘Die Brennessel, July 1933. The text below the depiction reads: ‘There you go with the Third Reich: no chance at a political career anymore. ’What do you mean Ilse, right now you are sitting there as a monument of a female politician.’ In the possession of the Deutsches Pressemuseum, Berlin.
   

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Die Ursache‘ (‘The Reason‘), depicted in the magazine ‘Simplicissimus’, 1939, Heft 2, page 21. The text below the depiction reads:
– ‘Why is it that Mr. Müller is so successful with women?’
– ‘Easy, he is hard of hearing, and never hears a no
Right: Johann Schult, ‘Geständnisse‘ (‘Confessions‘), depicted in the magazine ‘Simplicissimus’, 1939, Heft 31, page 364.
The text below the depiction reads:
– ‘It was really dangerous, when Hans kissed me yesterday evening’
– ‘Was he so passionate?’
– ‘No, we were in a folding boat!’
   

Johann Schult, ‘Blondes Mädchen‘ (‘Blond Girl‘). Displayed at the ‘Frühjahr-Ausstellung der Münchener Secession’, 1913). Depicted on the cover of the satirical magazine ‘Meggendorfer Blätter’, 16 January 1919.

Left: Johann Schult, ‘Feine Gesellschaft am Kamin‘ (‘Before the Fireplace‘), around 1920. Size 50 x 38 cm. Sold by a German auction house in 2010.
Right: Johann Schult, ‘‘Festliche Gesellschaft im Gasthaus’ (‘Festive Company‘). Size 33 x 27 cm. Published in the satirical magazine ‘Meggendorfer Blättern‘. Sold by a German auction house in 2013.
   

Charcoal drawings for the German weekly magazine ‘Fliegenden Blättern’. Created in the beginning of the 1920s.
Left: Johann Schult, ‘Elegantes Paar beim Tanz‘ (‘Elegant Couple dancing‘);
Middle: Johann Schult, ‘Das Gespräch nach dem Ball‘ (‘Conversation after the Ball‘);
Right: Johann Schult, tittle unknown.
   

Johann Schult, master-painter of Female Nudes
Johann Schult, illustrator, sketcher and (portrait-)painter, was born as the son of a treasurer on 28 February 1889 at Kirch Jesar (Mecklenburg); his date of death is unknown. He grew up in Hamburg, and from 1908 to 1911 he studied at the Munich Art Academy under Wilhelm von Diez and as Meisterschüler under professor Angelo Jank. From 1908 illustrations by Schult were published in German Youth-magazins like ‘Jugendblätter’ and ‘Deutschen Jugend’. Later his works were also published in the magazines ‘Fliegenden Blättern’, ‘Meggendorfer Blätter’, ‘Jugend’, ‘Simplicissimus’ and from 1921 onwards in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’.
In 1912 Schult was awarded the ‘Graf Schack Stipendium’, a scholarship granted by the Munich Academy. From 1914 to 1918 he was a civilian prisoner in Russia. After World War I, on his return from captivity, he settled in Munich.
Schult was member of the ‘Reichsverbund Bildender Künstler Deutschlands’. Works by Schult were displayed under the section of the ‘Münchener Künstler Genossenschaft‘ in the Glaspalast (‘Ballerina’ in 1927, which was also depicted in ’Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1927), and also under the section of the ‘Münchener Secession’ in the ‘Ausstellungsgebäude am Königsplatz (4 paintings in the ‘Früjahr-Ausstellung 1911’, and 5 paintings in the ‘Frühjahr-Ausstellung’ 1913).
From 1931 onwards, Johann Schult became caricaturist for the newspaper ‘Die Brennessel’ (‘The Burning Nettle’), a National Socialist publication that used satire and humour to ridicule the International Jewry, the Weimar Republic, International Communism, government bureaucrats, Churchill, Roosevelt, France and modern art.
At the Great German Art Exhibitions Schulte was represented with 15 works. Four female nudes were bought by Hitler for prices of up to 12.000 Reichsmark; other works were bought by Martin Bormann, Von Ribbentrop and Arthur Seys-Inquart. Several of Schulte’s works, especially the GDK-displayed paintings, were published in ‘Kunst im Deutschen Reich‘ and ‘Kunst dem Volk‘.

At the end of WWII, several stolen art collections -and 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection- were hidden by the National Socialists in the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic. ‘Erwartung’ (‘Expectation’, GDK 1943) by Schult was one of them.

Deutsches Historisches Museum is in the possession of ‘Die Ruhende’ (‘Resting’, GDK 1942 room 23, bought by Hitler for 12.000 Reichsmark), ‘Nach dem Bade’ (‘After Bathing’, GDK 1940 room 20, bought by Hitler for 4.000 Reichsmark, and ‘Im Lebensfrühling’ (‘Spring of Life’, GDK 1942 room 23, bought by Hitler for 12.000 Reichsmark).
‘Nach dem Bade’ is depicted in ‘Brückmanns Lexicon der Münchener Kunst‘, Sechster Band, 1994.
‘Im Lebensfrühling‘ was displayed at the exhibition ‘Kunst im 3. Reich, Dokumente der Unterwerfung’; the exhibition, instigated by the Frankfurter Kunstverein, was held from 1974 to 1975 in Frankfurt, Hamburg, Stuttgart, Ludwigshafen and Wuppertal. ‘Die Ruhende’, ‘Nach dem Bade’ and ‘Im Lebensfrühlimg’ were displayed at the exhibition ‘Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne‘, Weimar, 1999.
‘Im Lebensfrühling’  (GDK 1942) and ‘ ‘Nach dem Bade’ (GDK 1940) by Schult, were displayed at the exhibition ‘Art in the Third Reich, Seduction and Distraction’, Museum Arnhem, The Netherlands, November 2023 – March 2024. Photo’s Eva Broekema.