Sepp Hilz, Frauenportrait

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Sepp Hilz, Frauenportrait
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Description

‘Frauenportrait’ (‘Ladies Portrait’)

This painting presumably served as original model for the alugraph ‘In Memoriam’, depicted in the map ‘Sepp Hilz, Acht handsignierte Original-Alugraphien’, 1956.

Sepp Hilz, ‘In Memoriam’, alugraph, created around 1956. in possession of the Städtische Galerie Rosenheim. Depicted in the exhibition catalog ‘Vermacht -verfallen-verdrängt, Kunst und Nationalsozialismus’, 2017.

– condition : III
– size : 36 x 30 cm, unframed
– signed : right, on top
– type : oil on canvas
– msic. I : cleaning and framing on request
– misc. II : acquired from the artist; thence by descent

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BIOGRAPHY: SEPP HILZ

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Die rote Halskette’ (‘The Red Necklace’), portrait of the young Liselotte Prams. Created 1942. GDK 1942, room 35. Bought by Hitler for 5.000 Reichsmark. Depicted on the cover of the magazine ‘Frauen Warte’, January, 1943.
The painting was found back by Allied Troops in May 1945 in the salt mines in Altaussee, Austria. Between 1943 and 1945, the extensive complex of salt mines in Altaussee served as a huge repository for art stolen by the Nazis. It also contained some contemporary art works in the possession of Hitler, and holdings from Austrian collections. At the end of the war the entire depot stored 6,577 paintings, 137 sculptures, and 484 crates of other art. Most of the artworks were accumulated under the alias ‘Sonderauftrag Linz’ by Adolf Hitler and were intended for the planned Führermuseum in Linz, Austria.
Among the few dozens of contemporary artworks in the mines of Altaussee were works by Paul Ludwig Troost (2 works, assumably kept for sentimental reasons), Conrad Hommel, Fritz Kölle (bust of Horst Wessel), Hermann Joachim Pagels (bust of Bismarck), Hans Schwarte-Hellweg, and six works by Sepp Hilz. One work by Hilz, ‘Die Wetterhexe’ (‘Weatherwitch’, GDK 1942) was explicitly listed on the Inventory List of the Führermuseum, or the Linz Art gallery (National Archives Catalog, document nr. NAID: 34814843).
Right: ‘Die rote Halskette’ is in the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. Displayed on loan to the Germanisches Nationalmuseum in Nürnberg.
Size 68,5 x 65 cm, unframed 31,5 x 28,5 cm. Photo 2014.
  

‘The Red Necklace’, by Hilz, displayed in 1996 in ‘Art and Power, Europe under the Dictators 1930-1945’, a traveling exhibition in Europe (i.a. Barcelona and London). Depicted in ‘The New York Times’, March 3, 1996.

Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
In the beginning of 1944, Dr. Hans Reger (architect in charge of the Führerbau, Munich 1938-1945) shipped in several transports 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection -and other stolen art collections- to the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.
After the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Art works then considered as having no value, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind. They were photographed in August 1945 by the former director of the Czech State Institute of Photometry, Antonín Friedl, along with the photographer Jan Tuháček. ‘Die Wetterhexe’ and ‘Die Kübelträgerin’ by Sepp Hilz were among the paintings 
in the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Later, the art works previously owned by Hitler, ended up scattered across the country.
Since 2012, twenty-three paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found back at various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered at the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. One painting was found at the Military Institute in Prague, and four works were found at the Sychrov Castle. Four other paintings were found in the building of the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.
Three larges bronzes were found back at the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery: ‘The Rower’ by Hermann Zettlitzer, ‘Aphrodite‘ by Wilhelm Wandschneider, and ‘The Sower‘ by Willi Knapp.
‘Die Wetterhexe’ was found in Doksany; ‘Die Kürbelträgerin’ was found in the Zákupy Chateau. All the twenty-three paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Die Wetterhexe’ (‘Weatherwitch’). GDK 1942, room 4. Bought by Hitler for 35,000 Reichsmark.
Right: ‘Die Wetterhexe’ discovered in 2012 in the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, Czech Republic.
   

‘Wetterhexe’ by Hilz, described and depicted in the ‘Illustrierter Beobachter’, 29 October 1942.  

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Die Kübelträgerin’ (‘The Bucket Carrier’). GDK 1943, room 15. Bought by Adolf Hitler for 20.000 Reichsmark.
Right: ‘Die Kübelträgerin’ discovered in the Zákupy Chateau in the Czech Republic (at the right three works of the ‘Vier Tageszeiten’, by Willy Kriegel).
  

Sepp Hilz, postcards, ‘Bäuerliche Trilogie’ (‘Farmers Trilogy’). GDK 1941, room 15. Bought by Adolf Wagner, Gauleiter of München-Oberbayern, for 66.000 Reichsmark.
Left: ‘Die Mägde’ (‘The Maids’).
Right: ‘Das Füllhorn’ (‘The Horn of Plenty’); depicted in the exhibition catalogue. Also depicted in ‘Deutsche Kunst der Gegenwart’, Breslau, 1943.
Under: ‘Die Knechte’ (‘Servants’).
  

Left: Sepp Hilz, postcard, ‘Bäuerliche Venus’ (‘Farmer-woman Venus’). GDK 1939, room 15. Bought by Joseph Goebbels for 15,000 Reichsmark.
Right: Sepp Hilz in his studio with model Annerl Meierhanser, while painting ‘Bäuerliche Venus’ (1939). Depicted in ‘Kunst dem Volk’, 1939.
   

Left: Hilz with Annerl Meierhanser, depicted in the article ‘Resignation in Raten’, Der Spiegel, 2008.
Right: Hilz and Meierhanser, depicted in the American magazin ‘LiIfe’, May 1970.  

‘Bäuerliche Venus’ by Hilz, depicted on the cover of ‘Jugend’, number 31, 1939.

Left: ‘Malpauze im Atelier Sepp Hilz’, Bad Aibling, June, 1943. Break in the Atelier, with them model Annerl Meierhanser. Depicted in ‘Im Zauber der Farbe‘, 1943.
Right: Hilz with Meierhanser, depicted in the ‘Illustrierte Beobachter’ (likely in a 1942 edition).
    

Sepp Hilz, ‘Müder Alte’ (‘Tired old Man’), created 1942, postcard. GDK 1943, room 10. Bought by Hermann Göring for 30.000 Reichsmark. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst’, August, 1943. In the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen. Oil on wood, size 119 x 100 cm. The model -the old man- was named Kasper Bacher from Deggendorf.
The work ‘Müder Alte’ was part of the Hermann Göring Collection. Görings entire art collection comprised some 4,263 paintings, sculptures and tapestries. He planned to display them in an art gallery, the ‘Norddeutsche Galerie’, which should be founded after the war. The Norddeutsche Gallery was to be erected as an annex to Karinhall in the big forest of the Schorfheide, near Berlin.

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Alter Mann mit Haube‘ (‘Old Man with Hat‘). GDK 1942 room 35. Bought by Hitler for 5,000 Reichsmark. In the possession of the German Historical Museum, Berlin.
The painting was found back by Allied Troops in May 1945 in the salt mines in Altaussee, Austria.
Right: Sepp Hilz  ‘Alter Bauer’ (‘Old Farmer‘). Depicted on a postcard.
    

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Bauernbraut‘ (‘Peasant Bride‘). GDK 1940 room 15. Signed 1940, size 180 x 136 cm. Bought by Von Ribbentrop for 15.000 Reichsmark. Depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte’, 1941. In the possession of the Belvedere Museum, Vienna.
Right: Sepp Hilz in his studio with his model, 1935.
   

‘In der Kunstausstellung‘. At the Great German Art Exhibition, 1940. Depicted in ‘Im Zauber der Farbe‘, 1943 (it is unclear if the girl in front of the painting is the model).

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Die Eitelkeit’ (‘Vanity’). GDK 1940, room 15, sold for 15,000 Reichsmark. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue. Model was again Annerl Meierhanser.
Right: Sepp Hilz, postcard. ‘Mädchen aus der Miesbacher Gegend’ (‘Girl from the Miesbach-region’). Displayed at the Münchener Kunstausstellung 1941, Maximilianeum.
   

Sepp Hilz, ‘Alte und Mächen‘ (‘Old Woman and Girl‘). GDK 1944 room 11; depicted in the exhibition catalogue. Also depicted in ‘Velhagen & Klasing Monatshefte‘, 1944. Bought by Adolf Hitler for 8.000 Reichsmark. In the posession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum. Size 47 x 39 cm.
The painting was found back by Allied Troops in May 1945 in the salt mines in Altaussee, Austria.
Right: ‘Alte und Mädchen’, depicted in ‘Der Adler‘, 5 September 1944.
   

Sepp Hilz in the Neue Reichskanzlei: the 144-List
Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Der Alte (‘The Old Man’), GDK 1938 room 24. Bought by Hitler for 2.400 Reichsmark and placed in the Neue Reichszkanzlei (‘für die Inneneinrichtung des Erweiterungsbaues der Reichskanzlei’).
Right: Sepp Hilz, ‘Nach Feierabend’ (‘After Work’). GDK 1938, room 16; depicted in the exhibition catalogue. Bought by Hitler for 10.000 Reichsmark and placed in the Neue Reichszkanzlei (‘für die Inneneinrichtung des Erweiterungsbaues der Reichskanzlei’). Also depicted in ‘Österreichische Kunst’, 1938, Heft 7/8.
Displayed at the XXII Venice Biennale 1940 (‘Dopo cessato il lavoro’).
Both paintings are on the ‘144-list’.
   

The ‘144- list’ with 144 paintings, sculptures and graphic works which were bought by Hitler in 1938; they were transported to Berlin and placed in the Neue Reichskanzlei under construction, which was completed in January 1939. The list of 144 works is not exhaustive. Hitler did buy more works at the GDK in 1938, and in later years, which were also placed in the Reichskanzlei.

At page 4 are listed the two works by Sepp Hilz: ‘Nach feierabend’ and ‘Der Alte’.

What happened to the art Hitler purchased at the Great German Art Exhibitions?
With his insatiable passion for collecting art, Hitler was the most important purchaser of works from the GDKs. Every year, several times, he visited the Haus der Deustchen Kunst. From 1937 to 1944 he bought in total 1316 works at the GDKs.
Hitler’s mass art purchases were mostly undertaken without a plan regarding the future location of the works. He only had a specific usage in mind from the start for a few of these works of art. The majority of the paintings and sculptures acquired at the GDKs faced an uncertain future. They were stored at the Haus der Deutschen Kunst until further notice (some were eventually taken to the Führerbau).
Below we describe the fate of a limited number of artworks which were – as an exception- given a special destination by Hitler:
1. 144 paintings, sculptures and graphic works were bought by Hitler in 1938; they were transported to Berlin and placed in the Neue Reichskanzlei under construction, which was completed in January 1939. The list of 144 works (in our possession) is not exhaustive. Hitler did buy more works at the GDK in 1938, and in later years, which were also placed in the Reichskanzlei.
2. In 1939 Hitler gave 10 works of art to the Jagdmuseum in Munich: works by Carl von Dombroswki, Ludwig Eugen, Felix Kupsch, Friedrich Reimann (5), Karl Wagner and Renz Waller.
3. A few pieces were used to decorate Hitler’s various offices and private residences; for example, Adolf Ziegler’s ‘Die Vier Elemente’ was famously placed over the fireplace in a salon of the Führerbau in Munich.
4. In April 1943 Hitler had 21 paintings from the GDK delivered to his Munich apartment in the Prinzregentenstrasse. This delivery included works by Anton Müller-Wischin, Franz Xaver Wolf, Freidrich Schüz, Hermann Urban, Ludwig Platzöder, Sep Happ and Sepp Meindl.
5. In 1939 Hitler bought two works, explicitly meant for his own personal use: ‘Beethoven’ by Josef Jurutka and ‘Bauernkrieg’ by Franz Xavier Wolf.

‘Ultimo giorno d’auttunno 1917’
Sepp Hilz, ‘Spätherbst 1917’ (‘Late-autumn 1917’). GDK 1939, room 15. Size: 300 x 180 cm. Bought by Hitler for 25.000 Reichsmark. In the possession of the German Historical Museum. Displayed at the XXII Venice Biennale 1940 (‘Ultimo giorni d’autunno 1917’).
Displayed at the exhibition ‘Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne‘, Weimar, 1999.

‘Spätherbst 1917′ and ‘Nach Feierabend’, at the Biennale 1940. At 1.12 min.

    

Sepp Hilz, ‘Eva’, created 1940. Size 93 x 201 cm. GDK 1944 room 11. Bought by Hilter for 45.000 Reichsmark. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum. Displayed at the exhibition ‘Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne‘, Weimar, 1999.
The painting was found back by Allied Troops in May 1945 in the salt mines in Altaussee, Austria.

Sepp Hilz, ‘Kopf auf Goldgrund‘ (‘Head on Gold-ground’). Created in 1943.
Left: ‘Kopf auf Goldgrund’, displayed at the exhibition ‘Ausstellung Münchener Künstler‘, 1943, Maximilianeum. Depicted in the exhibition catalog.
Right: ‘Kopf auf Goldgrund’, sold by a German auction house in 2015.
   

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Fischermädchen’ (‘Fishermaiden’). Depicted in ‘Die neue deutsche Malerei’, Deutscher Verlag, Berlin, 1941.
Right: another version of ‘Fishermädchen’. Oil on wood. Size 22 x 18 cm.
  

Sepp Hilz, ‘Damenbildnis’. Portrait of the first wife of Hilz, Erika von Satzenhofen, 1938. Size 100 x 121 cm.  For this work Hilz was awarded the Lenbachpreis. The painting is still in the possession of the Lenbachhaus in Munich (‘Vermacht, Verfallen, Verdrängt’, Städtische Galerie Rosenheim, -Maximilian Westphal, 2017).

Sepp Hilz, ‘In Sonntagstracht’ (‘In Sunday Costume‘), 1951. Size 36 x 30 cm. Displayed by a Munich art gallery in 2015.

Sepp Hilz, ‘Betendes Bauernpaar’ (‘Praying Farmer-couple’). Displayed at the ‘Herbstausstellung der Gaudiensstelle München-Oberbayern der NS-Kulturgemeinde Blut und Boden’, 1935. Depicted in ‘Das Bild’.

Sepp Hilz, ‘Austragsbäurin’. Depicted is a retired woman farmer, living in distressed circumstances. Signed 1937. Size 96 x 102 cm. Offered by a German auction house in 2020.

Sepp Hilz, ‘Die Ausrast’ (‘Retirement‘). Displayed at the ‘Münchener Jahres Ausstellung‘, 1937, Neue Pinakothek. Depicted in the exhibition catalog.

Left: Sepp Hilz, ‘Der lichtmes Rosenkranz’ (‘Candlemas Rosary’). Postcard issued by ‘Kunstverlag Michel’, Nurnberg, nr. 7011 (stamped ’25 years Kunstverlag Michel’).
Right: ‘Inntalerin’ (‘Woman from the Inntal’). Depicted in ‘Jugend’, 1938, Heft 29. Displayed at the exhibition ‘Münchner Kunstausstellung Maximilianeum’, 1938; also depicted in the exhibition catalog.
  

Sepp Hilz, depicted in the ‘Illustrierte Beobachter’ (likely in a 1942 edition).


Sepp Hilz
Sepp Hilz, born in 1906 in Northern Bavaria, was the son of a painter and church restorer. After finishing his study at the Volksschule, his father send him to a School of Education in Rosenheim, but there he spend most of his time in  copying works by i.a. Dürer, Cranach and Altdorfer. From 1921 to 1927 he studied in Munich at the Kunstgewerbeschule (three semesters) and at the private school of graphic art he studied under Prof. Moritz Heymann and Xaver Dietrich. Until the end of the 1920s, Hilz dedicated himself to copying works by Dutch and Flemish masters, by Leibl, and to church-painting. From 1930 on he painted mostly landscapes in the style of Wilhelm Leibl and he became known as a ‘Bauernmaler’ (farmer painter). Bavaria was his preferable theme, as well as farmers, fieldwork, farm-girls, small country-villages, and simple country folk resting after a day of hard work. In May 1937 Hilz became member of the NSDAP.
In 1938 he participated in the ‘Münchener Kunstausstellung’ in the Maximilianeum and again in 1939, 1941 and 1943. In 1937 Hilz was, invited by Gau Leiter Wagner, represented at the ‘Münchener Jahres Ausstellung‘ in the Neue Pinakothek. In 1942 he took part in the ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’ in the Nationalgalerie, Berlin.
In 1938 he was awarded the Lenbach Preis of the City of Munich, for the portrait of his first wife Erika von Satzenhoven (nowadays in the possession of the Lenbachhaus). His painting ‘Nach Feierabend’ was exhibited in 1938 in the Haus der Kunst and it was bought by Hitler for 10,000 Reichsmark. A year later Hilz received, due to the intervention of Heinrich Hoffmann, 100,000 Reichsmark from Hitler to build himself a new studio at the Tegernsee. In 1939 Hilz displayed the famous ‘Baeuerliche Venus’, a farmer-woman nude from Bavaria which was purchased for 15,000 Reichsmark by Joseph Goebbels. Young men and soldiers were extremely enthusiastic about the painting and it quickly became an icon. Hilz received thousands of letters from men telling him about their interest in the model. A year later he used the same model, Annerl Meierhanser, for his painting ‘Die Eitelkeit’ for the GDK. In 1941 Hilz displayed the ‘Baeuerliche Trilogie’ (Farmers Trilogy) in the GDK. A year later ‘Wetterhexe’, (Weather-witch), was purchased by Hitler for 35,000 Reichsmark.
In total 28 works by Hilz were displayed at the GDK’s. Hitler bought 17, Joseph Goebbels 3, Adolf Wagner 3, Hermann Göring 2, Albert Speer 1 and Joachim von Ribbentrop 1, for prices of up to 45.000 Reichsmark. ‘Nach Feierabend’, bought for 10.000 Reichsmark by Hitler, was placed in the Neue Reichszkanzlei (‘für die Inneneinrichtung des Erweiterungsbaues der Reichskanzlei’). The painting is on the ‘144-List’, just like ‘Der Alte’ by Sepp Hilz, GDK 1938, room 37.
The work ‘Müder Alte’ (GDK 1943 room 10) was part of the Hermann Göring Collection, and destinated for the ‘Norddeutsche Galerie’. This gallery was planned to be erected after the war as an annex to Karinhall in the big forest of the Schorfheide, north of Berlin.
In 1943, at an age of 36, Hilz was granted the title of Professor by Adolf Hitler. In the last phase of the war, Hitler also put him on the Gottbegnadeten-Liste. Three works by Sepp Hilz were displayed at the XXII Venice Biennale 1940, including ‘Nach Feierabend’ (‘Dopo cessato il lavoro’ or ‘After Work’) and ‘Spätherbst 1917’ (‘Ultimo giorni d’autunno 1917’ or ‘Late-autumn 1917’).

After the war many of the works of Hilz, who was active with the restoration of damaged paintings in churches, were destroyed or stolen.
In 1950 and 1952 Hilz participated, together with Adolf Wissel, Constant Gerhardinger, Thomas Baumgartner and Hermann Gradl, in the exhibtions ‘Ausstellung deutscher Maler‘ in Sao Paulo, Brasil, organised by Galeria Itá/ Fritz Wilhelm Scheidt. A German paper in Brasil writes about the exhibition: ‘…zeigt dieser Veranstaltung….das nicht nur Krankhafte, abstrakte Kunst in Deutschland blüht, sondern dass —dort nach wie vor, noch gesund denkende und sauber arbeitende Künstler am werk sind..‘ (‘Adolf Wissel, by Ingeborg Bloth, 1994) .
But banned and out of favour in Germany due to his reputation as a former ‘Nazi-painter’, he gave up painting for good in 1956, eleven years before his death.
The Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen currently owns ‘Müder Alte’. The Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin is in the possession of six works bought by Hitler: ‘Spätherbst 1917’ (GDK 1939, room 15), ‘Die rote Halskette’ (GDK 1942, room 35), ‘Alter Mann mit Haube’ (GDK 1942, room 35), ‘In der Dämmerung’ (GDK 1944, room 11), ‘Eva’ (GDK 1940, room 11) and ‘Alte und Mädchen’ (GDK 1944, room 11).
‘Spätherbst 1917’ (bought by Hitler for 25.000 Reichsmark) and ‘Eva’ (bought by Hilter for 45.000 Reichsmark) were displayed at the exhibition ‘Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne‘, Weimar, 1999. In 2017, works by Sepp Hilz in the possession of the Städtischen Galerie Rosenheim, were displayed at the exhibition ‘Vermacht, Verfallen Verdrängt, -Kunst und Nationalsozialismus.

Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
In the beginning of 1944, Dr. Hans Reger (architect in charge of the Führerbau, Munich 1938-1945) shipped in several transports 43 paintings and 52 sculptures from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection -and other stolen art collections- to the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic.
After the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Art works then considered as having no value, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind. They were photographed in August 1945 by the former director of the Czech State Institute of Photometry, Antonín Friedl, along with the photographer Jan Tuháček. ‘Die Wetterhexe’ and ‘Die Kübelträgerin’ by Sepp Hilz were among the paintings 
in the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Later, the art works previously owned by Hitler, ended up scattered across the country.
Since 2012, twenty-three paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found at various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered at the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. One painting was found at the Military Institute in Prague, and four works were found at the Sychrov Castle. Four other paintings were found in the building of the Faculty of Law of the Charles University in Prague.
Three larges bronzes were found at the Aleš South Bohemian Gallery: ‘The Rower’ by Hermann Zettlitzer, ‘Aphrodite‘ by Wilhelm Wandschneider, and ‘The Sower‘ by Willi Knapp.
‘Die Wetterhexe’ was found in Doksany; ‘Die Kürbelträgerin’ was found in the Zákupy Chateau. All the twenty-three paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.

According to the magazine Spiegel of 14 September 1949, some official Third Reich art works were being exhibited in New York. The magazine reported: ‘Two million visitors in New York saw pictures that had formerly hung in the House of Art in Munich when it was still ‘brown’. Who brought them across the ocean is a mystery to officials from the US Collecting Point.’ It is not clear exactly which pictures were shown, but the article specifically mentioned several well known works by Sepp Hilz’s, including the Wetterhexe. Strange enough, the same Wetterhexe was unearthed from the Czech monastery in 2012; unless the in New York exhibited ‘Wetterhexe’ was a second version.

* As also stated in our General Terms and Conditions, German Art Gallery offers the depicted postcards for sale. Prices on request.